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sand casting

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02b.a0006584
EISBN: 978-1-62708-210-5
... Abstract This datasheet provides information on key alloy metallurgy, processing effects on physical and mechanical properties, and applications of Mg sand-casting alloy 520.0. Room-temperature aging characteristics for aluminum alloy 520.0-T4 are illustrated. aging characteristics...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02b.a0006586
EISBN: 978-1-62708-210-5
... Abstract Alloy 710.0 is a natural-aging aluminum alloy produced by sand casting and suitable for highly stressed castings. This datasheet provides information on key alloy metallurgy, processing effects on physical and mechanical properties, and fabrication characteristics of this 7xxx series...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006533
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... Abstract Sand casting processes are typically classified according to the type of binder present in the molding sand mixture. This article discusses common sand casting processes and design considerations related to shape, gating, feeding, and pattern making methods. It describes...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02b.a0006559
EISBN: 978-1-62708-210-5
... Abstract Alloy 295.0 is an Al-Cu-Si alloy suitable for sand casting requiring high strength with ductility and toughness. This datasheet provides information on key alloy metallurgy, fabrication characteristics, processing effects on physical and mechanical properties, and applications...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02b.a0006589
EISBN: 978-1-62708-210-5
... Abstract Alloys 771.0 and 772.0 are high-strength, shock-resistant, aluminum sand-casting alloys that develop a high combination of physical and mechanical properties in the as-cast and room-temperature-aged conditions. This datasheet provides information on key alloy metallurgy, processing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02b.a0006588
EISBN: 978-1-62708-210-5
... Abstract Alloy 713.0 is an aluminum-based casting alloy that ages at room temperature to provide high-strength sand and permanent-mold castings. This datasheet provides information on key alloy metallurgy, processing effects on physical and mechanical properties, and fabrication characteristics...
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 33 Sand casting, pressure die casting, and squeeze casting of aluminum/fly ash composite. (a) Sump pump cover. (b) Greenlee hydraulic tool handle cast at Eck Industries. (c) Mounting bracket die cast at Eck Industries. (d) Motor mounts cast at Thompson Aluminum More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 3 Metal casting simulation. (a) Schematic sand casting configuration. (b) Mesh (five million elements) for casting and cooling channels. (c) Computed local solidification times ranging from 1 to 3000 s. Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 7 Metal casting simulation. (a) Typical sand-casting configuration. (b) Automatically generated mesh (five million elements) for casting and cooling channels ( Ref 78 ). (c) Computed local solidification times, which range from 1 to 3000 s ( Ref 78 ) More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 9 A metal casting simulation. (a) Typical sand-casting configuration. (b) Automatically generated mesh (five million elements) for casting and cooling channels ( Ref 71 ). (c) Computed local solidification times, which range from 1 to 3000s ( Ref 71 ) More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 1 Patterns for a sand casting and its gating and risering systems, for four different methods of mold production More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 7 Eliminating the cored hole in this sand casting permitted a simple flat parting plane. Previously, a stepped parting plane was required, to permit removal of the core print from the mold. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 9 A radius at the junction of a cored hole and a sand casting face requires a shaped core, as in (a). Mismatch could result. Elimination of radius, as in (b), simplifies the core and removes the possibility of mismatch as a result of core s