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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001225
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... Abstract Molten salt baths are anhydrous, fused chemical baths used at elevated temperatures for a variety of industrial cleaning applications. This article discusses their applications in paint stripping, polymer removal, casting cleaning, glass removal, and plasma/flame spray removal...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005929
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
... Abstract This article provides information on the salt baths used for a variety of heat treatments, including heating, quenching, interrupted quenching (austempering and martempering), case hardening, and tempering. It describes two general types of salt bath systems for steel hardening...
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 5 Schematic of salt bath furnace. Agitated molten salt bath with sludge settling zone More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 2 Cutaway view of a salt bath furnace incorporating an agitated molten salt bath and a sludge settling zone More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 1 Salt bath hardening line with salt recovery systems. Source: Durferrit GmbH More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 3 Schematic of an enclosed molten salt bath cleaning line More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 1 Typical salt bath heat treating cycle for a high-alloy tool steel with three soaks, salt bath quenching, and triple tempering More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 5 Sequence of operations for two salt bath carburizing processes. (a) Conventional, requiring daily replenishment of bath with salts having high CN − concentrations. (b) Durofer, in which CN − level is maintained with addition of organic polymer material (CeControl regenerator More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 2 Salt bath hardening line for high-speed steels. Source: Durferrit GmbH More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 21 Effluent-free salt bath nitrocarburizing line. Source: Durferrit GmbH More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 9 Salt bath furnace. Courtesy of Borel Swiss AG More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 2 Typical cooling and cooling-rate curves for a nitrate-base molten salt bath at 255 °C (495 °F). No agitation or water addition. Average cooling rate from 650 to 260 °C (1200 to 500 °F) was 33.6 °C/s (60.5 °F/s). Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 3 Ventilation of a salt bath furnace with (a) a capture hood and (b) a canopy hood. The capture hood in (a) requires a ventilation rate of 200 m 3 /min (7120 ft 3 /min), whereas the canopy hood in (b) requires a larger ventilation rate of 905 m 3 /min (32,000 ft 3 /min). All dimensions More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 4 Externally heated salt bath furnaces for liquid carburizing More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 5 Internally heated salt bath furnace with immersed electrodes and ceramic tiles More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 7 Metal pot, immersed-electrode salt bath furnace for ferrous tempering and isothermal annealing—see table for standard sizes Typical standard sizes Temperature range Working dimensions Input, kW Heating capacity (A) Length (B) Width (C) Depth °C °F mm in. mm More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 8 Metal pot, immersed-electrode salt bath furnace for liquid carburizing, cyaniding, and carbonate baths—see table for standard sizes Typical standard sizes Temperature range Working dimensions Input, kW Heating capacity (A) Length (B) Width (C) Depth °C °F mm More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 9 Internally heated salt bath furnace with submerged electrodes. This furnace has a modified brick lining for use with carburizing salts. More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 16 Originally square billet dead weight body after several hundred salt bath quenching processes. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 11 Metallographic appearance of salt bath nitrocarburized mild steel after 1.5 h at 570 °C (1060 °F) followed by water quenching More