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rupture ductility

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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 8 Effects of creep-rupture ductility (a) on hold time effects (b) during low-cycle fatigue testing of a 1Cr-molybdenum-vanadium steel at 500 °C (930 °F). N f0 = fatigue life with zero hold time. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 8 Schematic creep curves for alloys having low and high stress-rupture ductility, showing the increased safety margin provided by the alloy with high stress-rupture ductility. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 50 Schematic creep curves for alloys having low and high stress-rupture ductilities, showing the increased safety margin provided by the alloy with high stress-rupture ductility More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 9 Schematic creep curves for alloys having low and high stress-rupture ductility, showing the increased safety margin provided by the alloy with high stress-rupture ductility. Source: Ref 18 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002349
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
... the cause of cracking or crack growth. This article discusses the macroscopic and microscopic basis of understanding and modeling fracture resistance of metals. It describes the four major types of failure modes in engineering alloys, namely, dimpled rupture, ductile striation formation, cleavage...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003545
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
...) failures are recognized by local ductility and multiplicity of intergranular cracks ( Fig. 4 ). However, creep deformation of engineering significance can also occur before intergranular fracture initiates. Stress-rupture data (log stress versus log time to failure) typically show an inflection when...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006780
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... for interpreting and understanding creep behavior. Generally, creep (distortion) failures are recognized by local ductility and multiplicity of intergranular cracks ( Fig. 5 ). However, creep deformation of engineering significance can also occur before intergranular fracture initiates. Stress-rupture data...
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 3 Ductile rupture in a ductile iron. Original magnification: 150×. Courtesy of Stork Technimet, Inc. New Berlin, WI More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001048
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
.... For temperatures above 480 °C (900 °F), the design process must include other properties such as creep rate, creep-rupture strength, creep-rupture ductility, and creep-fatigue interaction. Mechanical data of various steels at elevated temperatures are available in the ASTM data series (DS) listed in Table 2...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001035
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... contain 0.5 to 1.0% Mo for enhanced creep strength, along which chromium contents between 0.5 and 9% for improved corrosion resistance, rupture ductility, and resistance against graphitization. Small additions of carbide formers such as vanadium, niobium, and titanium may also be added for precipitation...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 Typical creep and creep rupture behavior of ductile polymers More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 2 Ductile rupture in a low-alloy steel casting. Original magnification: 3000×. Courtesy of Stork Technimet, Inc. New Berlin, WI More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 7 Mixture of cleavage fracture and ductile rupture (arrows) in a low-alloy steel casting. Original magnification: 1000×. Courtesy of Stork Technimet, Inc. New Berlin, WI More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 25 Stress-rupture properties of ductile iron: (a) Ferritic (annealed). (b) Pearlitic (normalized). The curve labeled creep shows the stress-temperature combination that will result in a creep rate of 0.0001%/h. Source: Ref 15 , 16 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 26 Stress-rupture properties of 2.5Si-1.0Ni ductile irons. (a) Ferritic. (b) Pearlitic. Source: Ref 15 , 16 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 27 Effect of 2% Mo on the stress rupture of 4% Si ductile iron at 650 °C (1200 °F) and 815 °C (1500 °F). Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 28 Master curves for stress rupture of ductile iron. Larson-Miller parameter is 10 −3 T (20 + log t ), where T is temperature in °R and t is time to rupture in hours. Source: Ref 14 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 21 Typical stress-rupture properties of high-nickel heat-resistant ductile irons. (a) At 595 °C (1100 °F). (b) At 705 °C (1300 °F). Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 15 Typical stress-rupture properties of high-nickel heat-resistant ductile iron More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 16 Typical creep and creep rupture curves for ductile polymers More