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rotational friction welding

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.a0005515
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
... Fig. 1 Principle of rotational friction welding. (a) Schemati. (b) Jaws of a commercial inertia friction welding machine designed for joining aeroengine turbine disks Fig. 2 Process characteristics of typical (a) direct-drive rotational friction-welding and (b) inertia friction...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001447
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
.... The initial torque peak is reduced by applying a low initial welding force (first friction), which reduces the rate at which heating occurs. This practice typically is used to reduce the power requirements at the beginning of the welding cycle. In addition, the spindle rotation in this process is either...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001382
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract This article provides information on radial friction welding, which adopts the principle of rotating and compressing a solid ring around two stationary pipe. The process evolution of this welding is illustrated. The article also examines the equipment used and operating steps. It also...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006500
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... Abstract This article focuses on friction stir welding (FSW), where frictional heating and displacement of the plastic material occurs by a rapidly rotating tool traversing the weld joint. Much of the research activity early on pertained to issues related to understanding the process...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001381
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Friction welding (FRW) can be divided into two major process variations: direct-drive or continuous-drive FRW and inertia-drive FRW. This article describes direct-drive FRW variables such as rotational speed, duration of rotation, and axial force and inertia-drive FRW variables...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005552
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Radial friction welding Orbital friction welding Rotational friction welding Direct-drive welding Inertia welding Angular (reciprocating) friction welding Linear (reciprocating) friction (or vibration) welding Friction stir welding Friction surfacing 6. Ultrasonic welding...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005596
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... welding parameter designs ROTARY FRICTION WELDING is a solid-state welding process that uses the compressive force of the workpieces that are rotating or moving relative to one another, producing heat and plastically displacing material from the faying surfaces, thereby creating a weld. Process...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005578
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
..., that is, where two parts are rubbed together to achieve coalescence, and therefore are not discussed in this article. The most common method of friction welding uses rotary motion, in which one axially symmetric component, a stud, tube, or bar, is rotated with respect to a stationary component. Upon reaching...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005575
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... of heat from any other source. Under normal conditions, no melting occurs at the interface. Figure 1 shows a typical friction weld, in which a nonrotating workpiece is held in contact with a rotating workpiece under constant or gradually increasing pressure until the interface reaches the welding...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001349
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... from any other source. Under normal conditions no melting occurs at the interface. Figure 1 shows a typical friction weld, in which a nonrotating workpiece is held in contract with a rotating workpiece under constant or gradually increasing pressure until the interface reaches the welding temperature...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005637
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... with a pinlike attachment is rotated and slowly inserted into the rigidly clamped joint to be welded ( Fig. 1 ). The frictional and deformational effects due to the rotating tool surface in contact with the workpiece cause plasticization of the metals to be joined. Translational movement of the rotating tool...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001383
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract In the friction surfacing process, a rotating consumable is brought into contact with a moving substrate, which results in a deposited layer on the substrate. This article describes the process as well as the equipment used. It also provides information on the applications...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.a0005526
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
.../m 2 ) ω Pin rotating speed (1/s) Γ c Portion of boundary where convective heat loss is taken into account Γ r Portion of boundary where radiative heat loss is taken into account ψ Helix angle of thread Fig. 1 Schematic tration of friction stir welding process Fig...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006389
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... welding (FSW) technology developed in the early 1990s at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. Friction stir welding is a solid-state joining method in which a nonconsumable rotating tool is plunged into and translated along the butting edges of parts being joined ( Ref 6 ). Friction stir welding...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005560
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Deposition by Friction Welding , Weld J. , Vol 65 ( No. 8 ), Aug 1986 , p 17 – 27 In the friction-surfacing process, a rotating consumable is brought into contact with a moving substrate, which results in a deposited layer on the substrate ( Fig. 1 ). First, the consumable rod is rotated...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003209
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... conversion of mechanical energy to thermal energy at the interface of the workpieces without the application of electrical energy, or heat from other sources, to the workpieces. Friction welds are made by holding a nonrotating workpiece in contact with a rotating workpiece under constant or gradually...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003209
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... in contact with a rotating workpiece under constant or gradually increasing pressure until the interface reaches welding temperature and then stopping rotation to complete the weld. The frictional heat developed at the interface rapidly raises the temperature of the workpieces, over a very short axial...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005629
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... Abstract A key differentiator between friction stir welding (FSW) and other friction welding processes is the presence of a nonconsumable tool in FSW, often referred to as a pin tool to differentiate it from other tooling associated with the process. This article discusses materials...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006089
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
.... Consequently, collision force, direction, and kinetic energy between two or more elements vary greatly within the ball charge. Frictional wear or rubbing forces act on the particles, as well as collision energy. These forces are derived from the rotational motion of the balls and movement of particles within...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005576
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
.... , “Description of a Pre-Rotation Defect in Friction Stir Welding of 5456 Aluminum,” Eighth International Symposium on Friction Stir Welding , May 18–20, 2010 ( Timmendorfer Strand, Germany ) 24. Hori H. , Makita S. , Minamida T. , Watanabe S. , Anzai E. , and Hino H...