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rotational friction welding

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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 1 Principle of rotational friction welding. (a) Schemati. (b) Jaws of a commercial inertia friction welding machine designed for joining aeroengine turbine disks More
Image
Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 11 Effect of tool rotational rate on defect formation in friction stir welding (FSW). Additionally, the effect of axial pressure on defects can be noted. Source: Ref 52 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.a0005515
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
... Abstract Friction welding is based on the rapid introduction of heat, causing the temperature at the interface to rise sharply and leading to local softening. This article illustrates the basic principles of direct-drive rotational friction welding and inertia friction welding. Modeling...
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 2 Process characteristics of typical (a) direct-drive rotational friction-welding and (b) inertia friction-welding processes More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001447
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Friction welding (FRW) is a solid-state welding process that uses the compressive force of the workpieces that are rotating or moving relative to one another, producing heat and plastically displacing material from the faying surfaces to create a weld. This article reviews practice...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001382
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract This article provides information on radial friction welding, which adopts the principle of rotating and compressing a solid ring around two stationary pipe. The process evolution of this welding is illustrated. The article also examines the equipment used and operating steps. It also...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001381
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract Friction welding (FRW) can be divided into two major process variations: direct-drive or continuous-drive FRW and inertia-drive FRW. This article describes direct-drive FRW variables such as rotational speed, duration of rotation, and axial force and inertia-drive FRW variables...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006500
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... Abstract This article focuses on friction stir welding (FSW), where frictional heating and displacement of the plastic material occurs by a rapidly rotating tool traversing the weld joint. Much of the research activity early on pertained to issues related to understanding the process...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005596
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... welding parameter designs ROTARY FRICTION WELDING is a solid-state welding process that uses the compressive force of the workpieces that are rotating or moving relative to one another, producing heat and plastically displacing material from the faying surfaces, thereby creating a weld. Process...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005578
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
..., that is, where two parts are rubbed together to achieve coalescence, and therefore are not discussed in this article. The most common method of friction welding uses rotary motion, in which one axially symmetric component, a stud, tube, or bar, is rotated with respect to a stationary component. Upon reaching...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001349
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... from any other source. Under normal conditions no melting occurs at the interface. Figure 1 shows a typical friction weld, in which a nonrotating workpiece is held in contract with a rotating workpiece under constant or gradually increasing pressure until the interface reaches the welding temperature...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005575
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... of heat from any other source. Under normal conditions, no melting occurs at the interface. Figure 1 shows a typical friction weld, in which a nonrotating workpiece is held in contact with a rotating workpiece under constant or gradually increasing pressure until the interface reaches the welding...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001383
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract In the friction surfacing process, a rotating consumable is brought into contact with a moving substrate, which results in a deposited layer on the substrate. This article describes the process as well as the equipment used. It also provides information on the applications...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005637
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... with a pinlike attachment is rotated and slowly inserted into the rigidly clamped joint to be welded ( Fig. 1 ). The frictional and deformational effects due to the rotating tool surface in contact with the workpiece cause plasticization of the metals to be joined. Translational movement of the rotating tool...
Image
Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 2 Inertia friction welding relies on a finite amount of stored energy and axial pressure to transfer energy to the common interface. First, one workpiece is rotated while the other is held stationary. The inertial mass is accelerated to a preselected speed. The two workpieces are brought More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005560
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... surfacing. friction surfacing friction-surfacing equipment metal substrates metallurgical bond FRICTION WELDING, a solid-state (nonmelting) joining process, relies on the presence of relative motion between the parts while they are being pressed together under an applied axial force...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.a0005526
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
... strucutural distortion FRICTION STIR WELDING (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state joining technique ( Ref 1 , 2 ). In FSW, material joining is facilitated by a rotating and traveling tool that penetrates into the workpiece material. The interaction between the tool and the workpiece material...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006389
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... a nonconsumable rotating tool is plunged into and translated along the butting edges of parts being joined ( Ref 6 ). Friction stir welding is shown schematically in Fig. 1 . Fig. 1 Schematic drawing of friction stir welding Friction stir welding involves frictional heating of the workpiece...
Image
Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 1 (a) Schematic of a friction stir tool being inserted into the workpiece. The process is also sometimes called the plunge period of welding. The workpiece is clamped firmly to prevent any movement. The tool rotation direction and the pin thread handedness are adjusted such that material More
Image
Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 1 Schematic showing fundamental steps in the friction welding process. (a) One workpiece is rotated, and the other workpiece is held stationary. (b) Both workpieces are brought together, and axial force is applied to begin the upsetting process. (c) Workpiece rotation is stopped More