1-20 of 358 Search Results for

rivets

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02b.a0006597
EISBN: 978-1-62708-210-5
... components for general engineering purposes, structural applications in construction and transportation, screw machine products, and fittings. Current use is limited, being used mostly for rivets. The 2017 alloy tends to crack during hot and cold deformation, and it is particularly difficult to forge. Rivets...
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 17 Five basic types of rivets used to fasten assembled products. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 19 Schematic of typical behavior of flush-head rivets. (a) Loading of rivet. A, bearing area of the upper sheet; B, bearing area of the lower sheet; L , load; P , shear component; P t , tension component; P r , resultant of shear and tension components. (b) Shear and tension failure More
Image
Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 18 Examples of self-piercing rivets. (a) Split rivet. (b) Semitubular self-piercing rivet. (c) Solid self-piercing rivet. (d) Clinch rivet More
Image
Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 29 Blind rivets. (a) Drive pin. (b) Pull-through mandrel. (c) Open end, structural flush break mandrel self-plugging. (d) Closed end, nonstructural break pull mandrel. (e) Multigrip flush break positive lock pull mandrel More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 17 Five basic types of rivets used to fasten assembled products More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 22 Schematic of typical behavior of flush-head rivets. (a) Loading of rivet. A, bearing area of the upper sheet; B , bearing area of the lower sheet; L , load; P , shear component; P t , tension component; P r , resultant of shear and tension components. (b) Shear and tension More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 2 Schematic diagram of self-piercing riveting with semitubular rivet. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 16 Rivet types. (a) Solid. (b) Semitubular. (c) Tubular. (d) Compression rivet More
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 5 Photographs of a cracked rivet (top) and dislodged rivet heads (bottom) from a boiler that experienced caustic stress-corrosion cracking. Source: Ref 5 More
Image
Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 12 Welded steel water transmission main from the 1920s with riveted circumferential joints, coated inside and out with bituminous coating More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 6 Crack origin inside a rivet hole developed from an existing corrosion pit More
Image
Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 20 Bore of die for cold heading the rivet shown at the left is typical of small bores finished by manual-stroke honing. Dimensions given in inches More
Image
Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 3 Fatigue life of riveted joints with different tension-shear-bearing ratios. Source: Ref 9 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 29 Cracking in a floor-beam web above the end of the riveted angle end connection. (a) Floor beam/tie girder connection. (b) Crack along the web-flange weld above the end connection More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 1 Illustration of the principle of punch riveting. Source: Ref 1 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 3 Cross section of components used during semitubular self-piercing riveting. Source: Ref 4 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 4 Operational sequence of the hydro-self-piercing riveting process. Source: Ref 7 More
Image
Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 8 Standard rivet heads More
Image
Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 22 Cold weld riveting joint. Source: Ref 16 More