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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004038
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... Abstract Ribs and bosses are the integral functional elements or features of a forging that project outward from a web in a direction parallel to the ram stroke. This article describes the design, functions, and producibility of ribs and bosses. It relates their design to grain flow...
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Published: 15 May 2022
Fig. 29 Examples and design features using ribs and gussets. (a) Ribs used to reinforce a thick circular molded component. (b) Using two thin ribs instead of one thick rib reduces thick sections that could result in sink marks, voids, and part warpage. (c) Typical rib dimensions, which depend More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 12 General rule for spacing (a) parallel ribs and (b) ribs for a ring More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 23 Boron-aluminum composite tubular struts used as the frame and ribs in space shuttle Orbiter. Struts are not cast but represent a category of metal-matrix composite applications. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 2 Adding four ribs to a tubular casting introduces no problems in removal of pattern from mold. Molding practice is the same as for the cylindrical shape of Fig. 1. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 3 Adding six ribs to a tubular casting necessitates core prints on the pattern, to permit withdrawal of pattern from mold. Cores are necessary to complete the mold. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 30 An improved design that eliminated one core and eight ribs from a sand casting. This resulted in a stronger, more economical part. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 5 When designing a cored hole between ribs or in a web design, design the hole to be round or oval with rounded corners (right). Rectangular holes (left) create manufacturing difficulties. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 5 Eight stiffening ribs in this alloy steel green sand casting were originally 0.100 in. thick; misruns made all castings produced unacceptable. Increasing thickness of these ribs to 0.125 in. almost completely eliminated rejections for misruns. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 21 In this aluminum permanent mold casting, thin connecting ribs made it difficult to feed the heavy center section. Increasing the size of the rib opposite the riser would have improved feeding. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 31 By increasing the size of the casting ribs, four gates were eliminated from this investment casting (8620 steel), at a cost saving of 28%. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 9 In this permanent mold casting, functioning of heavier ribs with thin walls induced hot tears and shrinkage at the junctions. Uniformity of wall thickness would have eliminated these defects. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 11 The addition of ribs to this brass investment casting corrected dimensional inaccuracies between upright sections, caused by mold restraint to normal metal contraction. Without ribs, the upright sections became tilted outward and were out of tolerance. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 29 Improved design that eliminated one core and eight ribs from a sand casting. This resulted in a stronger, more economical part. More
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Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 42 Eight stiffening ribs in this alloy steel green sand casting were originally 2.54 mm (0.100 in.) thick; misruns made all castings produced unacceptable. Increasing thickness of these ribs to 3.18 mm (0.125 in.) almost completely eliminated rejections for misruns. More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 3 Steps in two-stage chemical milling of I-beam ribs More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 14 Beads and ribs. (a) Cross section of a bead or rib formed in sheet metal for strengthening. (b) Concentric ribs formed around a hole to strengthen and stiffen the part. R , radius; T , stock thickness. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 1 Specimen forging, illustrating principal types of ribs and bosses. Sectional views are limited to ribs; ribs shown in (a) are drafted, those shown in (b) are no-draft equivalents. Flash or flash extension at parting lines is not shown More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 2 Conventional forging for landing gear support beam fittings, with ribs and webs designed to enhance rigidity and with end bosses designed for load support. Dimensions given in inches More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 3 Conventional forging for an engine mount fitting, with ribs and bosses designed for strength and rigidity. Dimensions given in inches More