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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 12
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2024
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v12.a0006841
EISBN: 978-1-62708-387-4
..., bronzes, and wrought irons. The article considers the applicabilities of fractography, metallography, and chemical analyses in answering archaeological and archaeometallurgical questions. The article also discusses the restoration and conservation of corroded and embrittled artifacts, including the use...
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 109 Carbon restoration (a) of decarburized layer (b) of spring steel (0.4% C, 1.8% Si, 0.3% Mn, 1.05% Cr, 0.25% Cu, 0.55% Ni, 0.07% Ti, 0.07% V. Source: Ref 106 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 10 Schematic of a single metallic restoration (R) showing two possible current ( I ) paths between external surface exposed to saliva and interior surface exposed to dentinal fluids. Because the dentinal fluids contain a higher Cl − concentration than saliva, it is assumed the electrode More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 18 Alloy restoration after intraoral usage showing the severity of plaque buildup that can occur. Source: Ref 75 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 41 SEM micrographs of the copper-aluminum restoration shown in Fig. 18 at higher magnifications. In (a), both accumulated plaque (A) and corrosion products (B) occur. (b) Higher-magnification view of the areas identified by (B) contain copper. The light-appearing areas are probably More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 3 Regions of restoration processes (recovery and recrystallization) under various thermomechanical conditions. (a) Rolling with a thickness strain of 50% results in static and dynamic recovery, although static recrystallization occurs in materials with a high stacking-fault energy. (b More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 5 Dynamic restoration. (a) Dynamic recovery. (b) Dynamic recrystallization More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 12 Scanning electron micrograph of a composite restoration (Concise) with severe occlusal wear after a seven-year period. 10×. Source: Ref 188 More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 13 Schematic of worn composite restoration indicating possible weak links More
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Published: 01 January 2024
Fig. 9 Romanesque kaptorga, (a) before and (b) after restoration. Courtesy of Jiří Děd, Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague, Czech Republic; Institute of Archaeology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic More
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Published: 01 January 2024
Fig. 26 Khan cup before restoration. Courtesy of Gerhard Stawinoga, Archaeological Landesmuseum, University of Kiel, Schloβ Gottorf, Schleswig, Germany More
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Published: 01 January 2024
Fig. 27 Khan cup after restoration. Courtesy of Gerhard Stawinoga, Archaeological Landesmuseum, University of Kiel, Schloβ Gottorf, Schleswig, Germany More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 8 Typical restored teeth. (a) Pin restored amalgam filling on vital tooth. (b) Cast metal crown restoration on endodontically treated tooth with silver cones and cement to seal root canals. (c) Cast metal crown restoration on endodontically treated tooth with cement core buildup More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 12 Schematic of two nonisolated, noncontacting restorations. The alloy restoration on the left, which is an amalgam, is more active than the restoration on right, which is a gold-base alloy. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 13 Schematic of two restorations making intermittent contact due to biting. The restoration in the lower arch, which is an amalgam, is more active than the restoration in the upper arch, which is a gold-base alloy. Two possible current pathways are shown. An additional path very likely More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 15 Schematic of two adjacent restorations in continuous contact. Two possible current paths shown. More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 14 All-ceramic dental restorations fabricated using selective laser sintering/cold isostatic processing (SLS/CIP) technology: (a) Digital tooth models and (b) ceramic products. Source: Ref 122 More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 26 Image of laser-based directed-energy deposition process used to restore geometric dimensions on a titanium shaft. Courtesy of the Center for Innovative Materials Processing through Direct Digital Deposition, Pennsylvania State University More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005967
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
.... The article illustrates the use of carbon restoration on decarburized spring steels. Different geometric models for carbide formation are shown schematically. The article also describes the different microstructural features such as grain size, microcracks, microsegregation, and banding. carbides...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05a.a0005711
EISBN: 978-1-62708-171-9
... Abstract Nuclear power plants benefit from thermal spray coatings for corrosion and erosion minimization and dimensional restoration of worn parts. This article provides a detailed discussion on the advantages of thermal spray coatings, fission reactor component coatings, and coatings...