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residual strength

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005936
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
... resistance) through high hardness (strength) and/or load-bearing capacity (fatigue strength) through compressive residual stresses near the surface. Furthermore, the focus is mainly on tempering and bearing steels—that is, materials that are heat treated without the need for additional alloying elements as...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006286
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
..., and high-temperature creep strength Reduce residual stresses developed during fabrication (stress relieving) Heat treatment is the “last chance” for the titanium user to control mechanical properties, and, of course, the extent of heat treatment property control is limited by the prior...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006252
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... fortuitous discovery at the beginning of the 20th century ( Ref 1 ), but part of their successful exploitation has required the parallel development of technologies capable of managing residual stress. Heat treatable aluminum alloys have the ability to be converted from a low-strength, ductile, and...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005956
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
... elastic strains are detectable, forming no persistent distortion. In a temperature range of 450 to 700 °C (840 to 1290 °F), the high–temperature yield strength of most low-alloy steels is reduced considerably. Heavy thermal gradients and residual stresses coming from the machining of the samples may then...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0006632
EISBN: 978-1-62708-213-6
... microstresses can be determined from the diffraction-peak breadth measured in conjunction with macroscopic residual-stress measurement. The peak breadth can be related empirically to material properties useful in materials engineering, including cold work level, yield strength, and hardness. The single...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006768
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... fatigue, compressive surface residual stress has a beneficial effect on lifetime and strength. In the case of the data shown in Fig. 15 ( Ref 46 ), it can be seen that XRD residual-stress measurements can be used to compare the effects of grinding and shot peening on the surface and subsurface residual...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005950
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
... , 8 , 9 , 10 ). Before starting this review, it is worth spending a few words on those and indicating where this article fits in the overall picture. Although all of those reviews have different strengths, focus here is on two of those reviews that pertain to different aspects of the subject. The...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001238
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... in high levels of hydrogen in ground steel samples ( Ref 54 ). Other examples include a sanding technique that influences the wettability and shear strength of wood ( Ref 55 ) and abrasive jet machining finishing techniques that are used where there is risk of explosion. In many manufacturing...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003100
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... Abstract This article describes the types of steels, including high-strength structural carbon steels and high-strength low-alloy steels (HSLA), available in all standard wrought forms such as sheet, strip, plate, structural shapes, bars, bar-size shapes. It discusses the special sections that...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003101
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... control of residual elements to low levels to obtain maximum toughness. Maraging steels comprise a special class of ultrahigh-strength steels that differ from conventional steels in that they are hardened by a metallurgical reaction that does not involve carbon. Instead, these steels are...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003195
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
..., in addition to material strength, heat treatment can result in the development of residual stresses (both compressive and tensile), dimensional changes (with respect to size and shape), and, in an extreme situation, component cracking, often referred to as quench cracking. These factors (residual...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006271
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... thicker leg contained mainly tensile residual stresses ( Fig. 13 ). Residual stresses in the range of approximately −200 to +150 N/mm 2 are relevant compared to the yield strength of the alloy. Component distortion can be seen from a top view ( Fig. 14 ) and from a side view ( Fig. 15 ). The one-sided...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003093
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... improvement of the mechanical and physical properties of the steel. Specifically, alloying additions are made for one or more of the following reasons: Improve tensile strength without appreciably lowering ductility Improve toughness Increase hardenability which permits the hardening of larger...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006260
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... strengths from aging hardening are generally associated with the most rapid quenching rates. Nonetheless, a maximum quenching rate is not necessarily a one-sided argument, because both distortion and residual stresses also develop with an increase in the rate of cooling. A balance must be obtained between...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005967
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
..., tempering can also lead to dimensional variation via relaxation of residual stresses and plastic deformation due to the temperature dependence of yield strength ( Ref 28 ). Fig. 21 Effects of tempering temperature on dimensional variation and retained austenite content of 100Cr6 steel austenitized at...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003203
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... corrosion resistance and optimum mechanical properties are obtained in the same heat treatment. THE HIGH-TEMPERATURE STRENGTH of all superalloys is based on the principle of a stable face-centered cubic (fcc) matrix combined with either precipitation strengthening and/or solid-solution...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005277
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... strength, usually affecting the interior sections in the casting, makes it inevitable that residual tensile stresses are a significant cause of casting failure in service. It is a scandal that many national standards for heat treatment specify water quenching, regardless of the size and complexity of the...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 17
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v17.a0006465
EISBN: 978-1-62708-190-0
... local material strength. They present as either distributed cracks along a melt pool path that tend to follow grain boundaries, as in Fig. 3 , or structural cracks formed in the bulk from cumulative residual stresses produced in each layer. Dissimilar materials can also be joined using additive...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 17
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v17.a0006476
EISBN: 978-1-62708-190-0
... in content, exhibit differing magnetic properties. Ferrite has a lower coercivity when compared to martensite, which bears itself out in the magnetic field strength required to elicit MBN ( Ref 10 ), as shown in Fig. 8 . Fig. 8 Example of magnetic Barkhausen noise signal amplitude versus...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001221
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... brush on Proprietary phenolic chromated methylene chloride 10–38 (b) 50–100 (b) Good ventilation and protective clothing. Must be approved for high-strength steels All others Steel Immersion Low viscosity (c) 10–38 (b) 50–100 (b) Good ventilation and protective clothing All (a...