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rectangular blanks

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Book Chapter

By Robert Bolin
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003982
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... the centerline, such rings can often be rolled from a simple blank and it behaves more predictably during rolling than an asymmetrical ring would if rolled singly. Examples of contour ring shapes are shown in Fig. 4 . Fig. 3 Typical rolled ring cross sections. (a) Rectangular. (b) Rings with...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003177
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... nonferrous metals. The article reviews the various types of forming processes such as blanking, piercing, fine-edge blanking, press bending, press forming, forming by multiple-slide machines, deep drawing, stretch forming, spinning, rubber-pad forming, three-roll forming, contour roll forming, drop hammer...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003181
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... operations in drawing cylindrical and rectangular shells are given in Table 4 . Table 4 Typical clearances between punch and die for successive drawing operations Draw Clearance per side, % of stock thickness Cylindrical shells First 110 Second 115 Third and subsequent 120...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004012
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... justified, but this may lead to the other types of failure mentioned previously. Flat traversing dies are the type most commonly used for rolling threads in commercial fasteners and similar parts. One technique involves the use of two flat, rectangular dies; one is stationary, and the other traverses in a...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003980
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... upsetting, which can be performed on round or rectangular bars, requires special tooling in the form of sliding dies. These sliding dies are inserted into the gripper-die frames. A typical sliding-die arrangement is shown in Fig. 15 . With this method, one of the sliding dies moves in the same direction...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.9781627081863
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003194
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
...: Tungsten carbide or sapphire. Work distance from nozzle, 0.010–3 in. Typical sizes—round: 0.007 to 0.032 in. diam; Rectangular: 0.003 × 0.020 in. to 0.026 × 0.026 in. to 0.007 × 0.150 in. Tolerances For chemical milling and chemical blanking. Metal removal or thickness of sheet:  0.002 in.—tolerance...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 2010
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22b.9781627081979
EISBN: 978-1-62708-197-9
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003135
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... made by canning the powder in a suitable metal container (generally copper) and hot extruding it to the desired size. Wire is made by cold drawing coils of rod. Strip is made either by rolling coils of extruded rectangular bar or by directly rolling powder with or without a metal container. Large...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003097
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... for bars 2 and 3 because the section is square, which implies equal reduction in section in both transverse directions. Fig. 5 Anisotropy and mechanical properties in forgings. Schematic views of sections from (a) square rolled stock, (b) rectangular rolled stock, (c) a cylindrical extruded...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004005
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... magnesium alloy workpieces, especially those with thin walls or irregular profiles for which other methods are not practical. As applied to magnesium alloys, the extrusion process cannot be referred to as cold because both blanks and tooling must be preheated to not less than 175 °C (350 °F); workpiece...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003183
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... not only higher forging loads, but also at least one more forging operation than parts (a) and (b) to ensure die filling. Fig. 10 Rectangular shape and three modifications, showing increasing forging difficulty (from a to d) with increasing rib height and decreasing web thickness Most...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003179
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
...-blade shearing is used for squaring and cutting flat stock to required shape and size. Mostly it is used for square and rectangular shapes, although triangles and other straight-sided shapes are also sheared with straight blades. Rotary shearing (not to be confused with slitting) is used for producing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003997
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
.... Cylindrical slugs are sometimes partially flattened before forging to promote better flow and consequently better filling of an impression. This can usually be done at room temperature between flat dies in a hammer or a press. A rectangular slug is occasionally obtained by extruding rectangular-section bar...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003241
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003978
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... and forging of stock and in the fabrication of common shapes from billets of square, rectangular, and round cross sections. The procedures described in the following examples are typical of those used for the production of some common open-die forgings. Fig. 10 Typical steps in drawing out...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0006677
EISBN: 978-1-62708-213-6
... of the sample is the field of view and can be controlled by the operator to be under a micrometer to over a millimeter. The number of pixels in the rastered region may consist of, for example, 1024 locations per row and 800 rows in the full rectangular region, which would produce a 1024 × 800 pixel...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003125
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... generally lower than in the other directions. In most cases the longitudinal, long-transverse, and short-transverse directions correspond to the greatest, intermediate, and smallest dimensions of product having a rectangular cross section. For products of axisymmetric cross section (round, square, hexagonal...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003986
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... ratio of the volume of a forging relative to the volume of a simple enclosing envelope. The enclosing envelope is described by the three major dimensions or by a diameter and a single dimension in the case of a round axisymmetric forging. Thus the enclosing envelope will be either a rectangular box or a...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005947
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
... irrelevant. In the hypothetical experiment, it is assumed that a component can be produced under ideal conditions, t is: A component with absolutely homogeneous chemical composition and homogeneous initial microstructure Without any texture A blank component without any residual...