1-20 of 414 Search Results for

quenched and tempered martensitic stainless steels

Sort by
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005985
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
... in martensitic stainless steels because it greatly improves corrosion resistance in certain environments without diminishing an alloy's ability to be tempered. Thermal Process Metallurgy The main concerns in processing martensitic stainless steels are austenitizing, quenching, tempering/stress relieving...
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
steel as-quenched and tempered; microstructure is tempered martensite with quench crack at the radius. 3% nital etch. Original magnification: 100×. (c) SAE 8630 steel as-quenched; microstructure is martensite where cracking initiated from rolling seam. (d) SAE type 403 stainless steel as-quenched More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001048
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
.... It gives some typical compositions of wrought heat-resistant stainless steels, which are grouped into ferritic, martensitic, austenitic, and precipitation-hardening (PH) grades. Quenched and tempered martensitic stainless steels are essentially martensitic and harden when air cooled from the austenitizing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4F
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 February 2024
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v4F.a0006995
EISBN: 978-1-62708-450-5
... is called tempering. During tempering, the structural saturation is reduced, and a new structure known as tempered martensite is formed. Nearly all applications require tempering after quenching to reduce the brittleness of the quenched steel. Tempering steel reduces hardness and increases toughness...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005953
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
... stainless steels. Specimens were tempered at 480 °C (900 °F) for 4 h. Fig. 10 Effect of variation in tempering temperature on hardness and impact strengths of wrought martensitic stainless steels Quenching Some decrease in corrosion resistance and ductility, resulting from air quenching...
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 5 Micrographs of cracks after heat treatment caused by seams in the steel. (a) Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) 8630 steel as-quenched; microstructure is martensite where cracking initiated from rolling seam (b) SAE type 403 stainless steel as-quenched and tempered; microstructure More
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003246
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
..., or martensite. Because as-quenched martensite is rather brittle, tempering is almost always performed before commercial utilization. Common Constituents in Ferrous Alloys Ferrite Fully ferritic steels are only obtained when the carbon content is quite low. Examples include electrolytic iron, certain...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006816
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
... rolling seam. (d) SAE type 403 stainless steel as-quenched and tempered; microstructure is predominantly tempered martensite with cracking promoted by the seam. Vilella’s reagent etch. Original magnification: 100× Fig. 5 Micrographs of cracks after heat treatment caused by seams in the steel...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005978
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
.../4.6 vs. 4.0 GPa) ( Ref 1 ). Historically, point-contact bearings with their higher unit stresses are made of homogeneous high-carbon steels heat treated by austenitizing, quenching to martensite, and tempering. Line-contact bearings also are made of through-hardening steels, but many incorporate...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001408
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... in both Europe and the United States ( Ref 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ). General Welding Characteristics As mentioned above, the compositions of martensitic stainless steels are specifically formulated to render them amenable to a quench-and-temper heat treatment in order to produce high levels of strength...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003090
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... 607 88 462 67 26 64 96 HRB Martensitic stainless steels (b) 403 Annealed bar 515 75 275 40 35 70 82 HRB Tempered bar 765 111 585 85 23 67 97 HRB 410 Oil quenched from 980 °C (1800 °F); tempered at 540 °C (1000 °F); 16 mm (0.625 in.) bar 1085 158 1005 146 13...
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 20 Tensile, yield, rupture, and creep strengths for seven ferritic and martensitic stainless steels. Types 430 and 446 were annealed. Type 403 was quenched from 870 °C (1600 °F) and tempered at 620 °C (1150 °F). Type 410 was quenched from 955 °C (1750 °F) and tempered at 590 °C (1100 °F More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 14 Tensile, yield, rupture, and creep strengths for seven ferritic and martensitic stainless steels Alloy Heat treatment 430 Annealed 446 Annealed 403 Quenched from 870 °C (1600 °F), tempered at 621 °C (1150 °F) 410 Quenched from 955°C (1750°F), tempered at 593°C More
Image
Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 11 Effect of austenitizing and tempering temperatures on mechanical properties of type 410 martensitic stainless steel. Austenitized 30 min; oil quenched to 65 to 95 °C (150 to 200 °F); double stress relieved at 175 °C (350 °F) for 15 rain and water quenched; tempered 2 h. (a) Quenched More
Image
Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 11 Effect of austenitizing and tempering temperatures on typical mechanical properties of type 420 martensitic stainless steel. Austenitized 30 min; oil quenched to 65 to 95 °C (150 to 200 °F); double stress relieved at 175 °C (350 °F) for 15 min and water quenched; tempered 2 h More
Image
Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 12 Effect of austenitizing and tempering temperatures on typical mechanical properties of type 431 martensitic stainless steel. Austenitized 30 min; oil quenched to 65 to 95 °C (150 to 200 °F); double stress relieved at 175 °C (350 °F) for 15 min and water quenched; tempered 2 h More
Image
Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 12 Effect of austenitizing and tempering temperatures on typical mechanical properties of type 414 martensitic stainless steel. Austenitized 30 min; oil quenched to 65 to 95 °C (150 to 200 °F); double stress relieved at 175 °C (350 °F) for 15 min and water quenched; tempered 2 h More
Image
Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 13 Effect of austenitizing and tempering temperatures on typical mechanical properties of type 416 martensitic stainless steel. Austenitized 30 min; oil quenched to 65 to 95 °C (150 to 200 °F); double stress relieved at 175 °C (350 °F) for 15 min and water quenched; tempered 2 h More
Image
Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 14 Effect of austenitizing and tempering temperatures on typical mechanical properties of type 420 martensitic stainless steel. Austenitized 30 min; oil quenched to 65 to 95 °C (150 to 200 °F); double stress relieved at 175 °C (350 °F) for 15 min and water quenched; tempered 2 h More
Image
Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 15 Effect of austenitizing and tempering temperatures on typical mechanical properties of type 431 martensitic stainless steel. Austenitized 30 min; oil quenched to 65 to 95 °C (150 to 200 °F); double stress relieved at 175 °C (350 °F) for 15 min and water quenched; tempered 2 h More