1-20 of 596 Search Results for

powder compaction

Sort by
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 3 Steps in powder compaction. A feed shoe provides powder to fill the die cavity, the upper and lower punch move toward each other to compact the powder, the lower and upper punches move upward to eject the part from the die, and the fill shoe removes the previous part and refills the die More
Image
Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 4 Schematic showing various stages in metal powder compaction. Source: Ref 1 , 2 More
Image
Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 29 Tool motions during a powder compaction cycle, showing the sequence of powder fill, pressing, and ejection. Source: Ref 4 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 22 Part geometry for case study of powder compaction modeling More
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 23 Instrumented press used for the case study of powder compaction modeling More
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 26 Illustration of powder compaction as predicted by the finite-element analysis model in Fig. 25 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006053
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
..., green machining, and injection molding. carbide powders cold isostatic pressing extrusion green machining injection molding powder compaction powder consolidation uniaxial pressing CONSOLIDATION and shaping of grade powders is carried out using several methods, depending on the size...
Image
Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 24 Effect of frequency on core loss for insulated iron-powder compact (AncorLam) and lamination steel. With increasing frequency, core loss for lamination steel increases at a faster rate than for insulated composite. Source: Ref 27 More
Image
Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 12 Relative density versus time during the sintering of copper powder compact (particle size = 11 μm; green density = 70%) at 980 °C in hydrogen. Source: Ref 100 More
Image
Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 13 Schematic evolution of a powder compact during liquid-phase sintering. The three dominant stages overlap significantly More
Image
Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 15 Densification curves for 98% W-1% Ni-1% Fe powder compact with different tungsten particle sizes (1 μm and 5 μm) during heating and isothermal sintering at 1460 °C (2660 °F). Source: Ref 110 More
Image
Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 10 Transverse rupture strength of iron, copper, and graphite powder compacts. Sintered to a density of 6.8 g/cm 3 in endothermic gas. Lines represent compositions having the same transverse rupture strength, given in MPa with ksi equivalent values in parentheses; combined carbon More
Image
Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 1 Simple toggle press used by Wollaston for making platinum powder compacts More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 3 Macroscopic appearance of P/M 2080/20 vol% SiC powder compacts forged at different strain-rate/strain combinations at 500 °C (930 °F). Source: Ref 5 More
Image
Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 30 Density distribution in a cylindrical nickel powder compact. Source: Ref 5 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006097
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract This article provides an overview of the compaction of metal powder in a rigid die and reviews the compaction characteristics of stainless steel powders, including green density, compressibility, green strength, apparent density, flow rate, and sintered density. It describes...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006032
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract This article describes several factors, which help in determining the compressibility of metal powders: particle shape, density, composition, hardness, particle size, lubrication, and compacting. It discusses the uses of annealing metal powders and describes compressibility testing...
Image
Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 7 Compaction of 99.9% pure molybdenum powder having FSSS = 4.5 μm. Source: Ref 4 More
Image
Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 12 Green strength versus compaction pressure for various types of powder. (a) Copper, iron and steel powders. (b) Iron powders More
Image
Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 4 Example compaction curve for an iron-base powder showing the relative density model results versus compaction pressure with no friction and with a friction coefficient of 0.1 for two compact samples. Source: Ref 24 More