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potential-pH diagram

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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 6 Potential-pH diagram for aluminum at 25 °C (77 °F). SHE, standard hydrogen electrode. Source: Ref 47 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 3 Potential-pH diagram for the Cu-NH 3 -H 2 O system. Total NH 3 equals 1 mol/L. Source: Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 16 Simplified Pourbaix (equilibrium potential-pH) diagram for the iron-water system. The upper dashed line shows the potential for H 2 O in equilibrium with O 2 . More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 13 Potential-pH diagram showing the domains of failure mode for 70Cu-30Ni brass in various solutions, together with the calculated positions of various boundaries relating to the domains of stability of different chemical species More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 14 Potential-pH diagram (Pourbaix) for iron in water at 25 °C (77 °F). A decrease in pH from 9 to 6 at potential of −0.2 V, which shifts iron from a region of stability to one of active corrosion, is indicated by the solid bar. More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 2 Potential-pH diagram of iron in water at 25 °C (77 °F) highlighting the corrosion processes in the hydronic pH range. SHE, standard hydrogen electrode More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 4 Potential-pH diagram for iron in supercritical aqueous solution at 400 °C (750 °F) and 50 MPa (500 bar), showing the approximate regions in potential-pH space for the operation of supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) reactors and supercritical thermal power plants. Source: Adapted from More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 1 Pourbaix (potential-pH) diagram for the titanium-water system at 25 °C (75 °F). Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 1 Pourbaix (potential-pH) diagram for the system iron-water at 25 °C (75 °F). Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 39 Superimposed potential-pH diagram of a 70Cu-30Zn alloy in 0.1 M NaCl. Lightly shaded area indicates the domain in which selective removal of zinc is expected in solutions free of copper ions. Intermediate-shaded area indicates the domain in which both copper and zinc dissolve. Dark More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003580
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... Abstract A potential pH diagram is a graphical representation of the relations, derived from the Nernst equation, between the pH and the equilibrium potentials (E) of the most probable electrochemical reactions occurring in a solution containing a specific element. This article describes three...
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 5 Potential-pH diagrams. (a) Zirconium in water at 25 °C (75 °F). (b) Theoretical conditions of corrosion, immunity, and passivation of zirconium at 25 °C (75 °F). (Kinetically, passivation may be extended to pH=−1.03.) More
Book Chapter

By Jerome Kruger
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003585
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... Abstract This article reviews the types of passivity and presents tactics that employ passivity to control corrosion. Thermodynamics provides a guide to the conditions under which passivation becomes possible. A valuable guide to thermodynamics is the potential-pH diagram and the Pourbaix...
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 2 Simplified potential-pH equilibrium diagram (Pourbaix diagram) for the iron-water system. Above equilibrium line A oxygen is evolved, and below equilibrium line B hydrogen is evolved. Source: Ref 11 More
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Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 9 The potential/pH (Pourbaix) diagram for aluminum. The stability of aluminum oxide is shown to range between ∼ 4 < pH < ∼8. Source: Ref 6 , reprinted by permission from Springer More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 1 Potential-pH (Pourbaix) diagram for the system of magnesium and water at 25 °C (77 °F), showing the theoretical domains of corrosion, immunity, and passivation. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 1 Potential-pH equilibrium diagram for the titanium-water system at 25 °C (77 °F). The diagram was established by considering, as derivatives of the tri- and tetravalent titanium, the hydroxide Ti(OH) 3 and the hydrated oxide TiO 2 -H 2 O. Lines a and b establish the stability region More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 7 Potential-pH equilibrium diagram for Ti-H 2 O system of 37 °C (99 °F). The dissolved titanium species are at an activity of 10 −6 . Lines a and b define the region of water stability. The experimentally recorded open-circuit potentials (OCP) of commercially pure (CP) titanium, Ti-45%Nb More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 4 A Pourbaix diagram (potential versus pH at 25 °C) for the copper, sulfur, water system derived using HSC Chemistry More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 1 Potential-pH (Pourbaix) diagram for iron at 25 °C (77 °F) in water. Ionic species are at activities of 10 −6 and 10 −4 . SHE, standard hydrogen electrode. SOL, in solution. DIS, dissolved. Source: Ref 2 More