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potential dust hazards

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05a.a0005717
EISBN: 978-1-62708-171-9
... and ventilation and heat exhaust. The article provides information on the personal protective equipment for eyes and skin from radiation, and ears from noise. It also discusses other potential safety hazards associated with thermal spraying, namely, magnetic fields and infrasound. dust collector fume gas...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006075
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... systems Table 3 Resources for powder metal dust collection systems Resource Information Hazard communication guidance for combustible dusts, OSHA 3371-08, 2009 Information about identifying and controlling the potential for dust explosions NFPA standard 68 Information about...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 24
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v24.a0006544
EISBN: 978-1-62708-290-7
... be considered a process hazard analysis ( Ref 1 ) or dust hazards analysis (DHA), which are far more comprehensive. (A DHA is defined as a systematic review to identify and evaluate the potential fire, flash fire, or explosion hazards associated with the presence of one or more combustible particulate solids...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05a.a0005759
EISBN: 978-1-62708-171-9
... spray booth or spray box structures and the equipment or systems—internal and external—required to operate the thermal spray processes within these enclosures. This includes the mitigation of sound, dust and fume, ultraviolet light, and mechanical (robotics) hazards that must be contained or controlled...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006030
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... with toxic materials. Fig. 4 Vacuum blasting is an example of local exhaust ventilation. When feasible, local exhaust ventilation is preferable because it controls atmospheric hazards at the source. Fig. 5 Dust-collection equipment is commonly used to provide dilution ventilation...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003050
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
.... According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and other regulatory bodies, lead is not the only hazardous material used in the ceramic and glass industries. For instance, silica has been classified as a possible carcinogen. For respirable silica dust (≤0.10 μm), OSHA has set...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005635
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... at the end of this article. Safety Management According to estimates made by the U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), over 30 million U.S. workers are potentially exposed to one or more chemical hazards from approximately 650,000 hazardous chemical products...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05a.a0005756
EISBN: 978-1-62708-171-9
... Source Assessment of hazard Eye and face protection Impact Chipping, grinding, machining, drilling, chiseling, riveting, sanding, grit blasting, etc. Flying fragments, flying objects, large chips, particles, sand, dirt, grit, dust, etc. Spectacles with side protection, goggles, face shields...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006065
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
..., are potentially explosive in the powdered form. These dusts may be the product of a given process or an unwanted byproduct. Safe handling of potentially explosive powders requires recognition of the hazards, proper handling techniques, and awareness of explosion prevention methods and fire fighting techniques...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0005650
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... solution for Al Mixture is unstable and can, and has, exploded with heating or in the presence of organic compounds, adding to the potential hazard. 60–90 parts perchloric acid 40–10 parts butyl cellosolve Electropolishing solution Solution will explode at room temperature. Solutions with ≤30% HClO 4...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001487
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... to recognize safety hazards. If they are to work in an unfamiliar situation or environment, they must be thoroughly briefed on the potential hazards involved. For example, consider a person who must work in a confined space. If the ventilation is poor and an air-supplied helmet is required, the need...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05a.9781627081719
EISBN: 978-1-62708-171-9
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002191
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
.... The hazards to humans from beryllium lie in the dust and chips produced during machining and operations such as polishing that produce aerosols. Therefore, the dust and chips must be controlled, and this can be done by using a tested exhaust system when cutting the material dry or by using a coolant...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05a.a0005757
EISBN: 978-1-62708-171-9
..., safe operating procedures, maintenance schedules, and so on. A judicious combination of engineering and administrative controls can often significantly reduce the risk of a potentially hazardous task without being too expensive to implement or too complex to work with on a daily basis. Ultimately...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003456
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... of environmental and safety concerns when machining and/or grinding composite components. Fiber dust could be potentially hazardous to human health, both physically and chemically. Free-floating composite fibers are not seen as a particular carcinogenic concern (as opposed to asbestos) due to their fiber diameter...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003691
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... protection standards for both the general (29 CFR 1910.134) and construction (29 CFR 1926.103) industries. The revisions directly impact both the removal and application of coatings. The revised standard requires more thorough assessment of potential inhalation hazards such as paints and solvents, increased...
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002186
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... hydrogen, which is flammable and potentially explosive. Accumulations of small volumes of hydrogen represent a severe hazard during the shipment or storage of wet magnesium chips. In addition, water will intensify a magnesium fire should one start in wet chips. Wet magnesium chips are inefficiently...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001118
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
...: International Lead-Zinc Study Group Typical chemical composition of EAF dust Table 8 Typical chemical composition of EAF dust Constituent Amount, % Valuable metals Zinc 5.0–37.8 Iron 13.0–44.0 Problem impurities Lead 0.7–7.0 Cadmium 0.01–0.16 Nickel 0.002–0.07...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006025
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
.... Environmental restrictions on coating application methods typically are a result of volatile solvent(s) in coating formulations that are emitted during application. This is particularly prevalent when the coating being applied has a strong odor and/or flammable solvents that have the potential to create...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004137
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... are often used where the solids being handled are more reactive. For example, if there is a potential for an explosive mixture of the dust with air, the wet scrubber eliminates this problem. Wet scrubbers are also versatile and can simultaneously remove dust and gas. The initial cost of scrubbers...