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polymeric implants

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005682
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... Abstract This article outlines the selection criteria for choosing an implant material for biomedical devices in orthopedic, dental, soft-tissue, and cardiovascular applications. It details the development of various implants, such as metallic, ceramic, and polymeric implants. The article...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005676
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
...-performance polymers for implants, tissue engineering, and bioresorbable polymers. bioresorbable polymers failure analysis high-performance polymers implants medical applications medical devices medical polymer selection medical polymers polymerization product life cycle tissue engineering...
Image
Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 1 Implant debris from two types of materials. The metal (cobalt alloy) is more rounded versus the polymeric (ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, or UHMWPE) debris, which is more elongated in shape. Metal debris can be produced at modular connections of implants, at articulating More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005666
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... > 2) ( Fig. 1 , 2 ). The particles produced by metal-on-polymer bearing implants are almost exclusively polymeric. Metallic debris can be produced by metal-on-polymer articulating implants but not typically from the bearing surface. Metal-on-polymer surfaces can produce metal debris when...
Book Chapter

By Matthew Donachie
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003168
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... metallurgy biocompatibility biomaterials dental application implant materials orthopedic application BIOMATERIALS are the man-made metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials used for intracorporeal applications in the human body. Intracorporeal uses may be for hard tissue or soft tissue replacement...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006863
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... the design process reduces the restriction. Various practical limbs have already been produced by vat polymerization. As for implant devices, metallic materials, titanium alloys ( Ref 76 – 85 ), cobalt-chromium alloys ( Ref 86 – 95 ), and stainless steels ( Ref 96 – 105 ) have been used for artificial...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006882
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... of this technology include ear and dental implants; however, many other applications such as scaffolds for tissue engineering applications are being extensively researched. Biomedical Applications for Hearing The hearing aid industry is a primary example of how vat polymerization has revolutionized its...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005667
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... requiring some level of biocompatibility may range from transient devices, such as protective gloves and urinary catheters, to permanent long-term implants, such as pacemakers and orthopedic devices. Generally, a polymeric material can be considered biocompatible if it does not elicit any adverse...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005678
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... to 0.935) polyethylene (LDPE) by the polymerization of ethylene gas and that high-density (specific gravity, 0.94 to 0.97) polyethylene (HDPE) was first produced in Europe and the United States in the 1950s. Thus, the introduction of UHMWPE into orthopaedic implants early in the 1960s represented a very...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006901
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... system made of an array of highly reflective aluminum micromirrors. Each mirror corresponds with a pixel on the project layer of UV light (commonly of a 405 or 380 nm wavelength) on the membrane and operates by the DMD controller ( Ref 6 ). The projected UV light layer on the tank polymerizes the resin...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006862
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... polymerization ( Ref 41 ) Polymers ( Ref 29 , 39 , 40 ) Medical implants Binder jetting ( Ref 42 , 43 ) Material extrusion ( Ref 44 ) Powder-bed fusion ( Ref 45 – 49 ) Vat polymerization ( Ref 50 ) Ceramics ( Ref 42 , 43 ) Metals ( Ref 45 – 49 ) Polymers ( Ref 44 , 50 ) Personal protective...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006861
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
... cytocompatibility in vivo biocompatibility three-dimensional inkjetting INKJET PRINTING is a digitalized printing technique in which a jet of ink droplets ejects through an array of micronozzles of a printhead and deposits on a paper or polymeric substrate to create two-dimensional (2D) letters, patterns...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003219
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... implantation in the context of research and development applications. corrosion-resistant coatings ion implantation ion plating physical vapor deposition sputtering thermal evaporation wear-resistant coatings PHYSICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION (PVD) processes involve the formation of a coating...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006404
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... previously, there are other areas that undergo corrosive/erosive wear conditions in artificial implants, including supporting equipment. Typical examples include stents, leaching of catalysts and stabilizers from polymeric tubing used for processes such as kidney dialysis, external blood pumps, or other...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005659
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... Abstract This article provides a summary of the biocompatibility or biological response of metals, ceramics, and polymers used in medical implants, along with their clinical issues. The polymers include ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, nonresorbable polymer, and resorbable polymers...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003792
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... that are typically assembled to create a prosthetic hip implant. A typical total hip implant system consists of a femoral stem (with or without a porous coating), a femoral head, a polymeric (ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene, or UHMWPE) liner, and a metal acetabular shell. Figure 1(b) shows a typical total...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006899
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
..., and oral maxillofacial surgery. Even though both soft and hard tissues exist in the maxillofacial region, the unique application in dentistry that makes AM attractive is the manufacture of teeth or tooth-like objects (e.g., the production of dentures, crowns, abutments, implants, and bridges...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05a.a0005741
EISBN: 978-1-62708-171-9
..., this implant pair gradually lost stability between implant and bone. During the 1970s to 1980s, the mechanism of implant loosening was thought to be bone cement related to polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). It was assumed that uncompleted polymerization of PMMA was leached out and caused bone absorption...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005660
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
.... A discussion on natural materials, nanomaterials, and stem cells is also provided. The article concludes with examples of biomaterials applications, such as endovascular devices, knee implants, and neurostimulation. biocompatibility biomaterials cardiac pacemakers cardiovascular applications ceramics...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 12 September 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23A.a0006902
EISBN: 978-1-62708-392-8
..., bioabsorbable polymeric stent prototype for heart valve implantation. Design of the stent geometry was performed based on a self-expanding laser-cut Nitinol stent. The polymeric stent was 3D printed from a flexible thermoplastic co-polyester elastomer using the Replicator 2X (MakerBot) ( Fig. 7a ). Tensile...