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polyethylene

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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 10 Extruded polyethylene cracked from prolonged outdoor exposure More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 14 Cathodic disbondment in areas of poor adhesion of a wrapped polyethylene coating system More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 29 Application of a polyethylene pipe coating by cross-head extrusion More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 30 Application of a polyethylene pipeline coating by side extrusion More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 35 Three-layer polyethylene coating consisting of (1) fusion-bonded epoxy primer, (2) copolymer adhesive, and (3) high-density polyethylene outer wrap More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 41 Joint-coating materials. HDPE, high-density polyethylene; HDPP, high-density polypropylene More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 46 High-density polyethylene tape wrapped over a tee in a fusion—bonded-epoxy-coated line More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 3 Polyethylene terephthalate is formed from the polyhydric alcohol ethylene glycol and the polybasic acid terephthalic acid. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 The evolution of engineering materials through history. PE, polyethylene; PMMA, polymethylmethacrylate; PC, polycarbonate; PS, polystyrene; PP, polypropylene; CFRP, carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic; GFRP, graphite-fiber-reinforced plastic; PSZ, partially stabilized zirconia. Source: Ref More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 3 Typical reprocessing system for polyethylene terephthalate (PET) More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 4 Production of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) by chemical decomposition. EG, ethylene glycol; TPA, terephthalic acid; DMT, dimethylterephthalate; BHET, bis-hydroxyethylterephthalate More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 6 Differential scanning calorimetry thermogram of polyethylene/polypropylene blend, 10 mcal/s range, 20 °C (36 °F)/min heating rate. PE, polyethylene; PP, polypropylene. Source: Ref 56 More
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Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 8 Differential scanning calorimetry determination of polyethylene in impact polycarbonate. Range, 0.00048 W (2 mcal/s; heating rate, 20 °C/min (36 °F/min); weight, 23 mg (0.355 gr). Source: Ref 51 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 15 Microstructure of high-density polyethylene containing a filler revealed using a polished specimen and Nomarski differential interference contrast. The magnification bar is 100 μm long. More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 6 Comparison of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) pin wear from uniaxial reciprocating motion at 2 Hz ( Fig. 3d ) and crossing motion at cycle rates of 1 and 2 Hz ( Fig. 3e ) for 2-million cycles. Source: Ref 37 More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 2 Experimental R -curve for a high-density polyethylene showing the dashed blunting line and the absence of blunting behavior. Source: Ref 35 More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 6 Schematic representation of ethylene and polyethylene More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 23 Rockwell hardness of engineering plastics. PET, polyethylene terephthalate; PA, polyamide; PPO, polyphenylene oxide; PBT, polybutylene terephthalate; PC, polycarbonate; ABS, acrylonitrile-butadienestyrene More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 24 Example of a material selection matrix. PE, polyethylene; PP, polypropylene; PVC, polyvinyl chloride; ABS, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene; PS, polystyrene More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 2 The evolution of engineering materials. PE, polyethylene; PMMA, polymethylmethacrylate; PC, polycarbonate; PS, polystyrene; PP, polypropylene; CFRP, carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic; GFRP, graphite-fiber-reinforced plastic; PSZ, partially stabilized zirconia. Source: Ref 9 More