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plasma spraying

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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 5 Consecutive subprocess simulation of atmospheric plasma spraying (APS). Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 4 Plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia on vacuum-plasma sprayed NiCrAlY. Courtesy of Drexel University More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 29 Vacuum or low-pressure plasma spray system with remote plasma gun ulation. Courtesy of Sulzer Metco (formerly ElectroPlasma Inc.) More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3 Plasma-sprayed nickel-base alloy. Courtesy of Thermal Spray Technologies More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 5 Micrograph of a typical two-phase NiCoCrAlY low-pressure plasma-sprayed coating after several hours of service. The dark aluminide phase is depleted near the coating surface as the aluminum is consumed to form the thermally grown oxide alumina scale visible under the nickel plating used More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 18 Enthalpy values of typical plasma spray gases as a function of temperature. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 19 Cross section of an external injection plasma spray gun. Courtesy of Sulzer Metco More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 20 Cross section of an internal injection plasma spray gun. Courtesy of Praxair TAFA More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 21 Plasma spray devices developed or owned by Praxair TAFA. (a) PlazJet. (b) SG-100. (c) SG-200. (d) 2700 Mini-Gun III More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 22 Plasma spray devices developed by Sulzer Metco. (a) 3MB-II. (b) 9M More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 23 Plasma spray device (model PG-100) developed by Bay State Surface Technologies More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 24 Typical plasma spray system More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 26 Air plasma spray metal coating microstructures showing oxidation levels. (a) High oxygen level in NiAl coating. (b) Typical gas level in 80Ni/20Cr coating More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 27 Optimal air-plasma-sprayed metallic coating microstructure, Tribaloy 400. Courtesy of Praxair TAFA (formerly Miller Thermal) More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 28 Typical microstructure of as-polished vacuum or low-pressure plasma-sprayed MCrAlY coating, unetched and etched. Courtesy of Metco GmbH More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 31 Radiofrequency (RF) induction-coupled plasma spray device and process for spray forming More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 12 Particle trajectories in a typical plasma spray stream More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 23 Schematic of the solution precursor plasma spray delivery system More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 6 Thin section of a vacuum-plasma-sprayed nickel-base alloy coating (Metco 700) as observed by transmission electron microscopy. The microstructure displays fine, equiaxed, recrystallized grains. RG, recrystallized grains; AT, annealing twins More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 8 Fracture surface of a plasma spray coating. Original magnification: 3000× More