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plain carbon steels

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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 21 Effect of carbon content on hardness in plain carbon steels, illustrating superhardness exhibited in induction-hardened steels (curve A). Also shown are data for furnace hardened and water quenched (curve B) and furnace hardened, water quenched, and tempered (curve C) steels More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 23 Effect of carbon content on hardness in plain carbon steels. Curve A: induction hardened. Curve B: furnace hardened and water quenched. Curve C: furnace hardened, water quenched, and tempered. The quenched-and-tempered steels were treated in liquid nitrogen following water quenching More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 17 Hardness data for 1030, 1050, and 1080 plain carbon steels plotted in terms of the Grange-Baughman tempering parameter. Source: Ref 3 , 8 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 18 Tempering curves for plain carbon steels plotted in terms of hardness as a function of the Grange-Baughman tempering parameter. Source: Ref 3 , 8 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 13 Elevated-temperature tensile test results for five plain carbon steels containing various amounts of aluminum nitride. The nitrogen content (in ppm) of the steels in the form of aluminum nitride was: A, 80; B, 70; C, 72; D, 2; E, 1. Source: Ref 51 Low-carbon steel Composition More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 1 Hardness of quenched and tempered plain carbon steels at various tempering temperatures. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 14 Tempering curves for plain carbon steels. Source: Ref 17 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 14 Effect of carbon content in plain carbon steel on the hardness of fine pearlite formed when the quenching curve intersects the nose of the time-temperature diagram for isothermal transformation More
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Published: 01 February 2024
Fig. 22 Effect of carbon content in plain carbon steel on the hardness of fine pearlite formed when the quenching curve intersects the nose of the time-temperature-transformation diagram for isothermal transformation More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 14 Tempering curves for (a) 0.31% C plain carbon steel and (b) 0.35C-2Mo alloy steel that exhibits secondary hardening. Note that time-temperature data are correlated in both cases with a parameter of the form T ( C + log 10 t ), where T is absolute temperature in Kelvin, C More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 8 Tempered martensite is the best structure for nitriding. Plain carbon steels are generally not suitable because the resultant case will be very brittle and tend to spall. To determine the level of hardenability required to obtain a martensitic microstructure for nitriding, select More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 3 (a) Coarse nitride needles in gas-nitrided plain carbon steel. (b) Coarse nitride needles at high magnification. Transmission electron micrograph More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 2 Microstructure of F-0008 plain-carbon steel compacted at 690 MPa (50 tsi) and sintered 980 °C (1795 °F) in argon. Etched with 2/5 nital. More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 15 Sample of plain carbon steel after low-cyanide salt bath nitrocarburizing treatment (Process 3). The high level of apparent porosity is a characteristic of high sulfur content in the compound zone; dark areas are actually iron-sulfide nodules, not voids. More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 3 Extent and finer structure of pearlite in a 0.5% C plain carbon steel from (a) furnace cooling (annealing) and (b) air cooling (normalizing). Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 18 Microstructure (a) of a plasma nitrocarburized plain carbon steel (En 8) sample with (b) corresponding diffraction pattern. The compound layer consists of varying amounts of Є (Fe 2–3 N) and γ′ (Fe 4 N) nitrides, the amounts of which can be controlled by furnace atmosphere selection. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 24 Influence of temperature on the erosion rate of plain carbon steel in a vibratory cavitation device. Source: Ref 62 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 23 Graphitized microstructure of SA-210-A-1 plain carbon steel. The structure is ferrite and graphite with only a trace of spheroidized carbon remaining. Etched with nital. 500× More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 7 Plain carbon steel, hardened but not tempered. (a) Taper section (horizontal magnification 1200×, vertical magnification 13,080×) of surface layers that were abusively ground, producing martensite (white-etching constituent) and tempering (dark-etching bands). (b) Dark-etching bands More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 68 Possible fracture zones mapped for a 0.2% C plain carbon steel in strain rate temperature space. T , testing temperature; T m , melting temperature. The zones, which are shaded in the diagram, are as follows: A, subsolidus intergranular fracture due to segregation of sulfur More