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photoelectric sensors

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0009152
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
..., proximity sensors, photoelectric sensors, and ultrasonic sensors. The article provides information on the sensors used for detecting tool breakages and flaws in parts, the measurement of material flow during sheet metal forming, and lubrication. It also describes the operating stages of machine vision...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003199
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... of the radiation wavelength band to which they respond. Total radiation sensors use thermal detectors, and narrow-band sensors use photoelectric detectors. Radiant energy from metals is characterized at lower temperatures as red hot (with longer wavelengths). At higher temperatures, it is characterized as white...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005931
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
... control. A huge variety of the operating principles (inductive, capacitive, ultrasonic, magnet operated, photoelectric, etc.), shapes, sizes, sensing distances, and operational voltages allows monitoring almost any mechanical position. Proximity sensors of different measuring technologies each have...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006432
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... of the incident γ ray being absorbed leads to the full energy peak at E γ . The full energy peak is also called photopeak, because it is mainly caused by the γ photon interacting with the detector material via the photoelectric effect. The full energy peak is characteristic for the isotope. If pair...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005928
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
... the flow rate. Both of these measurements require a known temperature and ure of the gas. Mass flow technology is used for some applications and is independent of temperature and pressure. Mass flow sensors use thermal principles in measuring gas flow. All feedback of the flow to a controlling device...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 17
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v17.a0006456
EISBN: 978-1-62708-190-0
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 17
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v17.a0006448
EISBN: 978-1-62708-190-0
..., there are 12 possible combinations of interaction and result. However, only four of these have a high enough probability of occurrence to be important in the attenuation of x-rays or γ-rays. These four combinations are photoelectric effect, Rayleigh scattering, Compton scattering, and pair production...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002439
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... the gate when the machine is in motion. Presence-sensing devices commonly use (a) a light beam and a photoelectric cell (“electric eye”) to stop the machine if the light beam is interrupted or (b) a radio frequency electromagnetic field that is disturbed by the capacitance effect of the introducing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005112
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... and the feeding device. Powered reels with variable speed and a loop control are preferred for a smooth operation. Noncontact sensor units, such as photoelectric cells or proximity switches, on the loop control should be used for soft metals, polished surfaces, and prepainted stock. These prevent damage...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003067
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.9781627082136
EISBN: 978-1-62708-213-6
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1986
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.9781627081788
EISBN: 978-1-62708-178-8
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003009
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
..., and impellers), and gears. Automotive applications that use the fuel resistance, low permeability, strength, stiffness, fatigue endurance, and good pigmenting capability and surface appearance of acetals are: Fuel handling systems: Fuel pumps and sending units, filler caps, level sensors, floats...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.9781627081993
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.9781627082006
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.9781627081627
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7