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permeability

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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 19 Moisture vapor permeability cup. Courtesy of the Paul N. Gardner Company (Gardco). Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 8 Induction and relative magnetic permeability of some ferromagnetic steels as a function of magnetic field strength. 1, (0.23% C); 2, (1.78% C). Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 11 Function φ( t ) for the evaluation of relative permeability of medium-carbon steel as a function of temperature and magnetic field intensity. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 12 Distribution of relative magnetic permeability within a ferromagnetic body. H 0 , surface magnetic field intensity (A/cm); x , distance from the surface; δ 0 , penetration depth calculated with surface permeability. Source: Ref 12 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 6 Typical variation in relative magnetic permeability (µ r ) during induction hardening and induction tempering More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 2 Effect of magnetic permeability on coil current (a) and efficiency (b); curves generated from computer simulation of heating a flat plate using a single leg of an inductor; 50 kW in the part under the coil face. Source: Ref 3 . More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 5 Magnetic permeability of some Fluxtrol soft-magnetic composite materials as a function of magnetic field strength. More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 9 Effect of laser scribing on the core loss of a high-permeability grain-oriented electrical steel. Source: Ref 23 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 19 Permeability as a function of bulk density (metal powder). Increases in bulk density reduce permeability of a material. Unless properly accounted for during bin selection, increased bulk density and reduced permeability can interrupt predictable flow. More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 5 Lea and Nurse permeability apparatus with manometer and flowmeter More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 7 Blaine air permeability apparatus. Source Ref 24 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 11 Effect of carbon pickup on permeability. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 7 Schematic of gas permeability testing apparatus More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 7 Magnetic permeability as a function of temperature and magnetic field intensity. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 6 Variations in the permeability index of P/M iron as a function of (a) sintering temperature, (b) duration of sintering, and (c) forming pressure. The magnetic permeability (for a constant magnetizing force) is shown as a percentage of the permeability of annealed, hot-rolled, low-carbon More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 12 Effect of nickel content on initial permeability, Curie temperature, and transformation in nickel-iron alloys More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 13 Relative initial permeability at 2 mT (20 G) for Ni-Fe alloys given various heat treatments. Treatments were as follows: furnace cooled—1 h at 900 to 950 °C (1650 to 1740 °F), cooled at 100 °C/h (180 °F/h); baked—furnace cooled plus 20 h at 450 °C (840 °F); double treatment—furnace More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 14 Progress in initial permeability values of commercial-grade nickel-iron alloys since early 1940s. Frequency, f , is 60 Hz. Thickness of annealed laminations was 0.36 mm (0.014 in.). More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 16 Effect of nickel content on the permeability-temperature characteristics of annealed nickel-iron temperature-compensator alloys at H of 3.7 kA · m −1 (46 Oe) More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 7 Direct current magnetization and intrinsic permeability curves for annealed cobalt strip. Intrinsic permeability (μ i ) is the ratio of B to H . Source: Ref 45 More