1-20 of 687 Search Results for

passivity

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Book Chapter

By Jerome Kruger
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003585
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... Abstract This article reviews the types of passivity and presents tactics that employ passivity to control corrosion. Thermodynamics provides a guide to the conditions under which passivation becomes possible. A valuable guide to thermodynamics is the potential-pH diagram and the Pourbaix...
Image
Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 3 Theoretical polarization curve for an electrode in the state of passivity, and corrosion current density determination by Tafel extrapolation More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 36 Water content necessary to maintain passivity of unalloyed titanium in static chlorine gas atmospheres. Source: Ref 138 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004173
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... Abstract This article focuses on the various types of corrosion-related failure mechanisms and their effects on passive electrical components. The types include halide-induced corrosion, organic-acid-induced corrosion, electrochemical metal migration, silver tarnish, fretting, and metal...
Image
Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 17 Polarization curve for a metal that undergoes active-to-passive and passive-to-transpassive transitions More
Image
Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 22 Prevalent passive approach, where residual stress due to manufacturing processes enhances fatigue life, which is not leveraged. Higher value creation is possible through an active feedback approach, by incorporating the residual stress in the design stage. More
Image
Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 1 Characterization of the passive layer of an electrochemically polished surface layer. ESCA, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 2 Characterization of the passive layer of a mechanically polished surface layer. ESCA, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 44 SHarP-C coils in the open position. Top coils are passive; bottom coils are active. Courtesy of Inductoheat Inc. More
Image
Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 5 Schematic for the structure of the passive oxide layer on aluminum as AlO 4− tetrahedral structures form a continuous chainlike coupling over the surface. Source: Ref 6 , reprinted by permission from Springer More
Image
Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 6 Schematic of passive layer enhanced by the adsorption of vinyl phosphonic acid and acrylic acid, a common conversion layer used as a primer layer for bonding polymers to aluminum. Source: Ref 6 , 23 . Reprinted by permission from Springer More
Image
Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 5 Schematic of the interface of a passivating alloy surface in contact with a biological environment, showing the protective (ceramic) oxide layer that forms over all metal implant surfaces and the biofilm layer of serum/plasma proteins that adsorbs onto the surface of the material More
Image
Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 23 Auger profile of nickel, titanium, and oxygen in passivated Ti-50.8Ni Nitinol showing an absence of nickel to a depth of several tens of angstroms More
Image
Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 17 X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data for analysis of a passivated stainless steel surface. The survey spectrum in (a) shows all elements at the surface, and multiplex spectra for (b) iron and (c) chromium show the chemical state for these elements. A high ratio of oxide for these two More
Image
Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 18 Time dependence of R pit o for Al 7075 (passivated in CeCl 3 ) during exposure to 0.5 N NaCl. Source: Ref 41 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 9 Schematic of the active metal/passive oxide/Helmholtz double layer/solution interfaces that are present on a passivated metal surface More
Image
Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 18 Schematic description of the point defect model for the growth of a passive oxide film More
Image
Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 10 Schematic representation of the activation-passivation transition mechanism of Fe-Cr alloy in an acidic medium Fe Fe ↔ k 1 / k − 1 Fe ( I ) ad + e − (Eq A) Fe + Fe ( I ) ad → k 2 Fe ( I ) ad More
Image
Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 5 Proposed models of the passive film. (a) General models include monolayers and multiple layers. Source: Ref 13. (b) Detailed proposed models for iron having single or double layers containing combinations of oxides, hydroxides, and oxyhydroxides. Source: Ref 14 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 6 Logarithmic plots of the growth of passive film on iron by potentiostatic anodic polarization at different potentials in pH 8.4 borate-buffer solution (a) Direct. (b) Inverse. Source: Ref 70 More