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passivation

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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 8 Correlation of corrosion defects to atmospheric passivation module water temperature and wafer spin speed. Dark gray bars, 500 rpm; light gray bars, 1000 rpm More
Book Chapter

By Jerome Kruger
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003585
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
...Abstract Abstract This article reviews the types of passivity and presents tactics that employ passivity to control corrosion. Thermodynamics provides a guide to the conditions under which passivation becomes possible. A valuable guide to thermodynamics is the potential-pH diagram...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004173
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
...Abstract Abstract This article focuses on the various types of corrosion-related failure mechanisms and their effects on passive electrical components. The types include halide-induced corrosion, organic-acid-induced corrosion, electrochemical metal migration, silver tarnish, fretting...
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 36 Water content necessary to maintain passivity of unalloyed titanium in static chlorine gas atmospheres. Source: Ref 138 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 11 Open-circuit potential of various passive hot-pressed and sintered samples in 1 N H 2 SO 4 solution at ambient temperature: A, 316 stainless steel; B, 316 stainless steel containing an additional 0.5 wt% Ni; C, 316 stainless steel containing 2 wt% Pt; D, 316 stainless steel containing More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 9 Passive current densities for high-purity aluminum and amorphous alloys of the Al-Co-Ce system, including heat treated material, in solution adjusted to various pH values using 1 M HCl or 1 M NaOH as neccesary. Source: Ref 56 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 18 Sputter-depth profile results for passive film grown on Mg 65 Cu 25 Y 10 from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, assuming the metal peaks are from the metal beneath the surface oxide layer. Source: Ref 120 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 9 Measured and calculated active/passive transitions. The upper boundary P t O 2 (W) was calculated from Wagner's approach ( Eq 23 and Ref 36 ), and the lower boundary P t O 2 (I) was calculated from Eq 22 and Ref 36 . Results are for the various types of SiC shown: chemical More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 3 Theoretical polarization curve for an electrode in the state of passivity, and corrosion current density determination by Tafel extrapolation More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 5 Schematic of the interface of a passivating alloy surface in contact with a biological environment, showing the protective (ceramic) oxide layer that forms over all metal implant surfaces and the biofilm layer of serum/plasma proteins that adsorbs onto the surface of the material More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 23 Auger profile of nickel, titanium, and oxygen in passivated Ti-50.8Ni Nitinol showing an absence of nickel to a depth of several tens of angstroms More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 9 Rates of passive film formation of austenitic stainless steel (SS-A) and high chromium cast iron (HCCI) balls in an oxygen atmosphere. Source: Ref 23 More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 18 Time dependence of R pit o for Al 7075 (passivated in CeCl 3 ) during exposure to 0.5 N NaCl. Source: Ref 41 More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 17 X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data for analysis of a passivated stainless steel surface. The survey spectrum in (a) shows all elements at the surface, and multiplex spectra for (b) iron and (c) chromium show the chemical state for these elements. A high ratio of oxide for these two More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 Corrosion characteristics of an active-passive metal as a function of solution oxidizing power (electrode potential) More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 30 Anodic polarization behavior of an active-passive alloy with grain-boundary depleted zones More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 17 Potential control in the passive region for anodic protection. Source: Ref 5 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004203
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
...Abstract Abstract This article discusses the corrosion characteristics of superaustenitic stainless and duplex stainless steels, which are used in pharmaceutical industry. It describes passivation treatments and the electropolishing of stainless steels. The article informs that electropolishing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003677
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
...Abstract Abstract This article provides a background of the complex relationship between titanium and its alloys with aqueous environments, which is dictated by the presence of a passivating oxide film. It describes the corrosion vulnerability of titanium and titanium oxides...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003220
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
...Abstract Abstract Although stainless steel is naturally passivated by exposure to air and other oxidizers, additional surface treatments are needed to prevent corrosion. Passivation, pickling, electropolishing, and mechanical cleaning are important surface treatments for the successful...