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passivation

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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 9 Same surface as in Fig. 8 after a hot nitric acid passivation treatment. Many of the laps on the grit lines have been dissolved and much of the polishing debris removed. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 8 Correlation of corrosion defects to atmospheric passivation module water temperature and wafer spin speed. Dark gray bars, 500 rpm; light gray bars, 1000 rpm More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 10 Schematic representation of the activation-passivation transition mechanism of Fe-Cr alloy in an acidic medium Fe Fe ↔ k 1 / k − 1 Fe ( I ) ad + e − (Eq A) Fe + Fe ( I ) ad → k 2 Fe ( I ) ad More
Book Chapter

By Jerome Kruger
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003585
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... Abstract This article reviews the types of passivity and presents tactics that employ passivity to control corrosion. Thermodynamics provides a guide to the conditions under which passivation becomes possible. A valuable guide to thermodynamics is the potential-pH diagram and the Pourbaix...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004173
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... Abstract This article focuses on the various types of corrosion-related failure mechanisms and their effects on passive electrical components. The types include halide-induced corrosion, organic-acid-induced corrosion, electrochemical metal migration, silver tarnish, fretting, and metal...
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 17 Polarization curve for a metal that undergoes active-to-passive and passive-to-transpassive transitions More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 36 Water content necessary to maintain passivity of unalloyed titanium in static chlorine gas atmospheres. Source: Ref 138 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 11 Open-circuit potential of various passive hot-pressed and sintered samples in 1 N H 2 SO 4 solution at ambient temperature: A, 316 stainless steel; B, 316 stainless steel containing an additional 0.5 wt% Ni; C, 316 stainless steel containing 2 wt% Pt; D, 316 stainless steel More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 9 Passive current densities for high-purity aluminum and amorphous alloys of the Al-Co-Ce system, including heat treated material, in solution adjusted to various pH values using 1 M HCl or 1 M NaOH as neccesary. Source: Ref 56 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 18 Sputter-depth profile results for passive film grown on Mg 65 Cu 25 Y 10 from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, assuming the metal peaks are from the metal beneath the surface oxide layer. Source: Ref 120 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 39 Current-potential diagrams. (a) Passive conditions. Tafel slope, β a >700 mV. (b) Corroding conditions. Tafel slope, β a <150 mV. Corrosion occurs as passivity is lost and active corrosion proceeds. SCE, saturated calomel electrode More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 3 Estimated water required to passivate unalloyed titanium in chlorine gas More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 Corrosion characteristics of an active-passive metal as a function of solution oxidizing power (electrode potential) More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 30 Anodic polarization behavior of an active-passive alloy with grain-boundary depleted zones More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 9 Measured and calculated active/passive transitions. The upper boundary P t O 2 (W) was calculated from Wagner's approach ( Eq 23 and Ref 36 ), and the lower boundary P t O 2 (I) was calculated from Eq 22 and Ref 36 . Results are for the various types of SiC shown: chemical More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 12 Depth profile of the chemical composition of a passive layer on an Fe-18at.%Cr alloy. (a) Normalized fractions of the standard components Cr met , Cr ox , Fe met , and Fe ox in the Auger spectra as a function of the sputtering time. (b) Concentrations of the alloy elements in metallic More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 1 Characterization of the passive layer of an electrochemically polished surface layer. ESCA, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 2 Characterization of the passive layer of a mechanically polished surface layer. ESCA, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 22 Prevalent passive approach, where residual stress due to manufacturing processes enhances fatigue life, which is not leveraged. Higher value creation is possible through an active feedback approach, by incorporating the residual stress in the design stage. More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 3 Theoretical polarization curve for an electrode in the state of passivity, and corrosion current density determination by Tafel extrapolation More