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overheating

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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 1 Grain-boundary oxidation and melting due to overheating during forging. Unetched More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 2 Intergranular “rock candy” axle shaft fracture due to overheating during forging More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 20 (a) Two-turn inductor that failed due to copper overheating. (b) Dark turn is the lead (enter) turn, and bright turn is the trail (exit) turn. More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 33 Accelerated deterioration of the copper surface due to overheating resulted in premature coil failure. More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 36 Gap-by-gap inductor that failed prematurely due to overheating of magnetic flux concentrator laminations. Source: Ref 28 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 37 Short-term and rapid overheating of a steel boiler tube (reheater, superheater, or similar—source unknown) resulted in a longitudinal “fish-mouth” rupture. The tube had experienced elevated temperatures (455 to >730 °C, or 850 to >1350 °F) where the metal strength is markedly More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 30 Micrographs showing the effects of overheating and burning on microstructures of copper forgings. (a) Overheated copper C10200 forging showing oxides (black particles). The forging was heated to 1025 °C (1875 °F). (b) Burning (black outlines) at grain boundaries of a copper C11000 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 39 Microstructural characteristics of overheating. (a) Test fracture and (b) tensile-bar fracture from an overheated forged liner made from AISI H12 tool steel. Both 2×. (c) Micrograph illustrating the very coarse martensitic grain structure due to overheating during forging. Etched More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 7 Thin-lip rupture in a boiler tube that was caused by rapid overheating. This rupture exhibits a “cobra” appearance as a result of lateral bending under the reaction force imposed by escaping steam. The tube was a 64-mm (2 1 2 -in.) outside-diameter × 6.4-mm (0.250-in.) wall More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 13 Causes of overheating during machining process attributable to friction and low heat absorption problems More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 Creep damage (bowing) of a cobalt-base alloy turbine vane from overheating More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 28 52100 steel jet-engine ball bearing that failed because of overheating resulting from misalignment. (a) Photograph of bearing components showing fractured cage. (b) Enlarged view of cage showing damage caused by scoring, scuffing, and plastic deformation around ball pockets More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 1 Typical short-term overheating and long-term creep failures. (a) Typical thin-lip, short-term overheating failure of a 9.5 cm (3.75 in.) outside diam by 8.7 mm ( 11 32 in.) wall tube. Scaling caused the 13 cm (5 in.) knife-edge rupture. (b) Typical thick-lip, long-term creep More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 86 Alloy steel compressor disk that cracked from overheating during forging. (a) Macrograph of disk (cracking at arrow). 0.4×. (b)Fracture surface of a specimen from the disk that was normalized, quenched, and tempered to 321 to 341 HB. The treatment revealed facets indicative More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 10 Example of overheating and burning of forgings (a) black oxide from overheating of copper forging heated to 1023 °C (1875 °F) (b) Burning (black outlines) at grain boundaries of copper forging heated to 1065 °C (1950 °F) More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 11 Photograph of thin-lip rupture in a boiler tube caused by rapid overheating More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 39 Microstructural characteristics of overheating. (a) Test fracture and (b) tensile-bar fracture from an overheated forged liner made from AISI H12 tool steel. Original magnification of both: 2×. (c) Micrograph illustrating the very coarse martensitic grain structure due to overheating More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 19 Dendritic microstructure caused by billet overheating adjacent the typical spheroidal microstructure in an as-formed 356 aluminum alloy component. Sample prepared by polishing to a 1 μm finish on a diamond wheel and etched with a 0.5% HF solution. Courtesy of the Industrial Materials More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 1 Creep damage (bowing) of a cobalt-base alloy turbine vane from overheating More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 9 (a) Short-term and (b) long-term overheating of boiler tubes. Long-term overheating usually is caused by creep as the microstructure of the material degrades at temperature over time. Grains do not deform, but voids develop at grain-boundary junctions and grow and coalesce over time More