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notched specimens

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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 15 Sequence effects in unnotched and notched specimens of 2024-T3. Source: Ref 37 More
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Published: 15 June 2019
Fig. 12 Rotating-beam ( R = −1.0) fatigue properties of notched specimens from wrought and cast aluminum alloys. Source: Ref 34 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 65 Charpy V-notch specimen (notch area outlined) with crack path along shear plane due to crack-tip blunting More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 30 Charpy V-notch specimen used for the evaluation of notch toughness (ASTM E 23). Dimensions given in millimeters More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 2 Charpy V-notch specimen used for the evaluation of notch toughness (ASTM E 23). Dimensions given in millimeters More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 65 Charpy V-notch specimen (notch area outlined) with crack path along shear plane due to crack-tip blunting More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 26 Series of fractographs of Charpy V-notch specimens of 4340 steel tested at different temperatures, showing the change in appearance and estimated percentages of fibrous fracture. Source: Army Materials and Mechanics Research Center, Watertown Arsenal More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 30 Fatigue data (a) showing sequence effects for notched-specimen and smooth-specimen simulations (2024-T4 aluminum, K f = 2.0). Load histories A and B have a similar cyclic load pattern (Δ S 2 ) but have slightly different initial transients (Δ S 1 ) with either (b) a tensile More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 5 Fracture surfaces of the broken Charpy V-notch specimens in Fig. 4 . These photographs show the amount of lateral expansion in nickel-chromium-molybdenum steel specimens tested in (a) the upper-shelf region (1.5 mm, or 0.059 mil) and (b) the lower-shelf region (0.05, or 0.002 mil More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 11 Schematic showing location and orientation of Charpy V-notch specimens taken from the 1.07 m (42 in.) diameter X-65 steel pipe. Although inset shows widely spaced samples for the sake of clarity, actual samples removed are typically adjacent to one another. More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 21, 22 Surface of a tension overload fracture in a notched specimen of annealed Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V alloy that was broken at room temperature. The tensile strength of the material was 1000 MPa (145 ksi). The fracture surface consists of dimples of various sizes, a few of which show some More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 21 Surface of an impact fracture in a notched specimen of wrought iron. The longitudinal stringers of slag in the material are parallel to the direction of fracture, which gives the surface this typically “woody” appearance. Compare with Fig. 22 . 6× More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 898 Surface of a fatigue-test fracture in a notched specimen of OFHC copper that had undergone a 67% reduction in cross-sectional area by cold work before being tested in dry air. Region shown here is 3 mm (0.12 in.) from the notch, where slow crack growth caused irregular striations More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 1018 Tension-overload fracture in notched specimen of aluminum alloy 7075-T6. Notched tensile strength, 750 MPa (109 ksi); unnotched tensile strength, same as in Fig. 1015 . Surface is flat and coarsely fibrous. Considerable secondary cracking is evident, even at this low magnification More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 1165 Tensile-overload fracture surface of a notched specimen of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V heat treated to the same mechanical properties as specimen in Fig. 1162 and with a notched tensile strength of 1696 MPa (246 ksi). Crack nucleus is below center, at right. See also Fig. 1166 . 9× More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 1244 Surface of a tension-overload fracture in a notched specimen of stress-relieved TZM alloy (Mo-0.5Ti-1.0Zr) sheet. Unnotched tensile strength was 972 MPa (141 ksi). The specimen was notched on each edge to a depth of 2.5 mm (0.1 in.) with a jeweler's saw and broken at room temperature More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 392 Surface of a fracture in a notched specimen of AISI 4340 steel that was broken in tension overload, showing scattered dimples. It is not certain whether the remainder of the surface in this area consists of quasi-cleavage facets or of large dimples that have undergone appreciable More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 426 Tension-overload fracture in a notched specimen of AISI 4340 steel, heat treated to a hardness of 27 HRC and tested at −40 °C (−40 °F), showing a completely fibrous surface. See Fig. 427 and 428 for fractures in similar specimens tested at different temperatures. 17× More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 427 Surface of a tension-overload fracture in another notched specimen of AISI 4340 steel, the same as in Fig. 426 , but tested at −120 °C (−185 °F). Two distinctly different fracture-surface zones are visible; a fibrous zone, which originated at the notch, surrounds a radial region More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 428 Surface of tension-overload fracture in a third notched specimen of AISI 4340 steel, the same as those in Fig. 426 and 427 , but tested at 155 °C (−245 °F). At this low test temperature, a completely radial fracture was produced. The surface shows no fibrous zone, only radial marks More