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nonoxide ceramics

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002463
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
... ceramics, refractories, structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and electronic and magnetic ceramics. General processing variables that can affect structure and compositional homogeneity are discussed. Traditional ceramics that include both oxide and nonoxide ceramics are also reviewed. The article...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003056
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
..., and the more advanced joining of nonoxide ceramics. It also discusses metallizing, brazing, diffusion bonding, and chemical bonding. brazing ceramic-ceramic joining ceramic-metal joining chemical bonding diffusion bonding glass-metal sealing metallizing nonoxide ceramics MANY APPLICATIONS...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003357
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... Abstract This article focuses on the production methods, properties, and applications of two main types of commercially available continuous-length ceramic fibers, namely, oxide fibers based on the alumina-silica system and on alpha-alumina, and nonoxide fibers based primarily on beta-phase...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003551
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... to the dense-zone magnesia formation theory); how nonoxide refractories (and nonoxide structural ceramics) without exception are subject to high-temperature oxidation; and finally, how, in the presence of alkalis, refractory chromites (Cr 3+ ) can be oxidized in part to toxic chromates (Cr 6+ ). The alkali...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 20
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1997
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v20.a0002490
EISBN: 978-1-62708-194-8
.... Technical ceramics include oxide and nonoxide materials used for a number of industrial applications such as electrical porcelains, electronic substrates, wear parts, and chemically resistant parts. It also includes advanced ceramics providing particularly demanding performance in engine parts, biomedical...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003359
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... Abstract For the reinforcement of metal-matrix composites, four general classes of materials are commercially available: oxide fibers based primarily on alumina and alumina silica systems, nonoxide systems based on silicon carbide, boron fibers, and carbon fibers. This article discusses the key...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003352
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
.... Ceramic fibers are polycrystalline. Oxide ceramic (e.g., silica-alumina and pure alumina) fibers and nonoxide ceramic (e.g., silicon carbide) fibers ( Ref 4 ) are used to reinforce CMCs and MMCs ( Ref 5 ). Value-in-Use In a PMC, the primary function of a reinforcing fiber is to increase...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003449
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... 5.5 5.0 27 Aluminosilicate glass matrix Aluminosilicate glass + SiC (w) 30 338 49.0 3.4 3.1 28 Reinforcement: p, particulate; pl, platelet; w, whisker Composite Architecture The ceramic matrix in a DR-CMC may either be an oxide or nonoxide material and, depending...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003795
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... is mostly used for oxide ceramics. Typical etching temperatures are 150 °C (270 °F) below sintering temperature in air. Etching time can vary between 15 min and some hours, depending on the structure and composition of the grain boundary that evaporates during the heat treatment. Thermal etching of nonoxide...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003372
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... Abstract This article focuses on the process methods and matrix chemistries of ceramic-matrix composites. These methods include pressure-assisted densification, chemical vapor infiltration, melt infiltration, polymer infiltration and pyrolysis, and sol-gel processing. The article discusses...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003831
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
..., hafnium, and silicon, promote better adhesion with the ceramic. In the case of nonoxide ceramics, such as carbides and nitrides, elements showing strong interactions with carbon and nitrogen increase the surface energy and wetting of the ceramic surface. In the case of active metal brazing, it is very...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003063
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... pound. The most promising reinforcements for ceramics are nonoxide fibers with small diameters, high strength, and high modulus. Various oxide fibers are also being evaluated. Polycrystalline fibers are limited to maximum temperatures of 3630 to 4030 °C (2000 to 2200 °F) because of creep and grain...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001318
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... 36 , 37 , 38 , 39 , 40 , 41 , 42 , 43 , 44 , 45 ). Internal chemical modifications can be made either by mixing the carbonaceous and nonoxide inhibitor powders and consolidating the constituents to form the carbon body, or by impregnating the porous body with liquids that contain...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003054
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... are limited in size. The majority of electrically heated sintering furnaces use resistance heating. They can be conveniently classified based on the type of material used as the resistance heating element: Graphite Refractory metal Nonoxide ceramics Oxide ceramics Graphite Heating...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003052
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... be permanent parts of the chemical makeup of the product. In certain processes, particularly in nonoxide ceramics processing, both functions may be fulfilled. Sintering Aids and Dopants Sintering aids and dopants are intentional modifications of the base chemistry of the ceramic. They can be categorized...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001457
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
..., manganese, or lithium, should enhance both the wetting of and adherence to oxide ceramics, without the need for coating the ceramic surface. In the same way, the wetting of and adherence to nonoxide ceramics, such as silicon carbide and silicon nitride, are aided by filler metals containing elements...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003319
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... with the increasing concentration of OH− ions, which break the metal-oxygen-metal bonds in silicate glass and oxide ceramics. For nonoxide ceramics that do not contain a glassy phase (e.g., SiC), the presence of room temperature water vapor may have little effect on crack growth rates. Acid base pairs have...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006380
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
..., titanium alloys) will usually be covered with an oxide film, which itself is covered by a second film of adsorbed gases and hydrocarbons (such as oils and other hydrocarbons). Ceramic materials may be covered with adsorbed gases and oils, but, in addition, even the nonoxide ceramics can oxidize...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0006671
EISBN: 978-1-62708-213-6
... realized that minor oxide glassy phases, even just a few atoms thick, on grain boundaries of nonoxide and oxide ceramics can promote creep and plastic stress relief at elevated temperature and affect ambient strength as well. High-temperature ceramic superconductors require close control...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003422
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... , 53 , and 54 ). Internal chemical modifications can be made either by mixing the carbonaceous and nonoxide inhibitor powders and consolidating the constituents to form the carbon body, or by impregnating the porous body with liquids that contain the inhibitors, usually in oxide form. Boron...