1-20 of 301 Search Results for

noble metals

Sort by
Image
Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 8 Log (current) versus potential illustration of the influence of noble metal alloying on the kinetics of the cathodic half-reaction that reinforces spontaneous passivity on dilute titanium alloys. Curve 1, current of cathodic half-reaction on unalloyed titanium; curve 2, current More
Image
Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 4 Crater formation in a steel substrate beneath a void in a noble metal coating, for example, passive chromium or copper. Corrosion proceeds under the noble metal, the edges of which collapse into the corrosion pit. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 1 (a) and (b) U.S. industrial demand of noble and precious metals for dental and medical use (1970–1990). Source: Ref 4 , Ref 5 , Ref 6 , Ref 7 , Ref 8 , Ref 9 , Ref 10 , Ref 11 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 2 (a) and (b) U.S. dollar costs of noble and precious metals per troy ounce (1970–2010). Source: Ref 12 , Ref 13 , Ref 14 , Ref 15 , Ref 16 , Ref 17 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005670
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... Abstract This article focuses on the use of noble and precious metals for biomedical applications. These include gold, platinum, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium, iridium, and osmium. The physical and mechanical properties of noble and precious metals are presented in tables. A brief discussion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003834
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
...: noble metal clad systems, corrosion barrier systems, sacrificial metal systems, transition metal systems, complex multilayer systems, and clad diffusion alloys. cladding corrosion control sacrificial metal systems clad metals noble metal clad systems corrosion barrier systems transition...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004181
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... of various metals and alloys in HCl, including carbon and alloy steels, austenitic stainless steels, standard ferritic stainless steels, nickel and nickel alloys, copper and copper alloys, corrosion-resistant cast iron, zirconium, titanium and titanium alloys, tantalum and its alloys, and noble metals...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003158
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
..., and great versatility of application. Thermocouples are grouped into two broad categories, namely, standard thermocouples, including five base-metal thermocouples and three noble-metal thermocouples that have been given letter designations, and nonstandard thermocouples, including iridium-rhodium, platinum...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003620
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... dissolution. dealloying corrosion porous residue dezincification graphitic corrosion dealuminification noble metal alloys current-potential porous metal ionization-redeposition surface diffusion volume diffusion percolation model DEALLOYING is a corrosion process in which one or more...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003607
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... electron flow between them when they are electrically coupled in a conductive solution. The direction of electron flow, and therefore the galvanic behavior, depends on which metal or alloy is more active. The more active metal or alloy becomes anodic, and the more noble metal or alloy becomes cathodic...
Image
Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 7 Potential-current relationships for the case of a galvanic couple between two corroding metals. Iron is the more noble metal; zinc is less noble metal. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 5 Design details that can affect galvanic corrosion. (a) Fasteners should be more noble than the components being fastened; undercuts should be avoided, and insulating washers and spaces should be used to completely isolate the fastener. (b) Weld filler metals should be more noble than More
Image
Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 7 Design details that can affect galvanic corrosion. (a) Fasteners should be more noble than the components being fastened; undercuts should be avoided, and insulating washers should be used. (b) Weld filler metals should be more noble than base metals. Transition joints can be used when More
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 5 Design details that can affect galvanic corrosion. (a) Fasteners should be more noble than the components being fastened; undercuts should be avoided, and insulating washers and spaces should be used to completely isolate the fastener. (b) Weld filler metals should be more noble than More
Image
Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 31 Design details that can affect galvanic corrosion. (a) Fasteners should be more noble than the components being fastened; undercuts should be avoided, and insulating washers should be used. (b) Weld filler metals should be more noble than base metals. Transition joints can be used when More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 39 Chronology of implementation of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), and zinc injection, and noble metal chemical application (NMCA) More
Image
Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 5 Corrosion pit formation in a substrate beneath a void in a duplex noble metal coating. The top coating layer (M 1 ) is cathodic to the coating underlayer (M 2 ), which is in turn cathodic to the substrate (M 3 ). As in Fig. 4 , the coating tends to collapse into the pit. Source: Ref 2 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004170
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... are primarily based on their electrical, magnetic, and optical properties, ranging from noble metals such as gold and silver to more reactive metals such as aluminum and its alloys. Table 1 shows typical applications of conductors and contact materials ( Ref 18 ). The functionality of devices requires...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001266
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... for the reduction of the metal ion to the metal to be deposited on the metal substrate. Chemical deposition can also be accomplished by galvanic reaction between a less noble metal and a more noble metal ion. The noble metal is deposited via this reaction. This form of the process is known as immersion plating...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003142
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
..., where titanium does not become passivated. Under reducing conditions, it has a galvanic potential similar to that of aluminum and undergoes accelerated corrosion when coupled to more noble metals. In most environments, titanium is the cathodic member of any galvanic couple. It may accelerate...