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no-bake binder systems

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Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005242
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
..., such as bentonites, are discussed. The article describes the methods of sand bonding with inorganic compounds. It provides a description of resin-bonded sand systems: no-bake binder systems, heat-cured binder systems, and cold box binder systems. The article concludes with a discussion on the media used...
Book Chapter

Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005354
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... no-bake resins, and urethanes. The article provides an overview of gas-cured organic binders. It also illustrates the three commercial systems for sand reclamation: wet reclamation systems, dry reclamation systems, and thermal reclamation. Selected References Selected References • Archibald...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005186
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... are carved from expanded polystyrene and placed into a green sand mold. The process, known today as lost-foam casting (using loose, unbonded sand), is patented a short time later. Phenolic and furan acid-catalyzed no-bake binder systems are introduced. Ductile iron desulfurization via shaking ladles...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003172
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... years, a number of resins have been developed as binders for sand, primarily for making cores, although they are also used as molds. These binder systems generally fall into one of the following categories: no-bake, cold box, protein, hot/warm box, and shell (Croning). In these processes, sand...
Book Chapter

Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005244
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... to cure the core. Heat-cured (hot box) processes require the core box to be heated to 175 to 290 °C (350 to 550 °F) prior to introduction of the prepared sand. The no-bake process uses binder systems that consist of chemicals that, when mixed together in sand, cure without the introduction of an external...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006297
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
.... and Lott M. , Sand Binder Systems, Part VII: Acid Catalyzed PNB and Blown No-Bake , Foundry Manage. Technol. , Sept 1995 , p 46 – 54 27. White K.B. and Winters D.L. , Second Generation Ester-Cured Phenolic Cold Box Technology , Trans. Am. Foundry Soc. , Vol 96 , 1988 , p...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003692
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... not undergo any chemical change after, or at the time of, application. On application, the solvent carrier volatilizes, and the coating system sets, hardens, and attains its final resistant properties as the solvent evaporates. Heating or baking is often used to hasten solvent evaporation. However, because...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005249
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... dimensional stability without detracting from surface finish (see the section “Mold Stabilization” in this article). Baking is the final stage of processing. All remaining volatiles are removed, and the colloidal silica left by the hydrolyzed ethyl silicate binder forms a high-temperature bond of SiO 2...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003693
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... commonly formulated from epoxy polyamide and polyurethane binders. Alkyds have been used for some air-dry formulations, but they are most commonly used with baking formulations, notably in the automotive industry. Vinyl and chlorinated rubber binders are not volatile-organic- compound compliant...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005163
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
...–80 Advanced high-strength steel >550 >80 Type classifications for high-strength steels and advanced high-strength steels Table 3 Type classifications for high-strength steels and advanced high-strength steels Designation Type High-strength steels BH Bake...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001277
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... by their ability to form a smooth surface that is typically of high gloss, but may also include lower degrees of gloss such as flat enamels. Enamels may air dry or bake. Air-dry enamels are cured essentially by a combination of solvent evaporation and oxidation. Baking enamels incorporate catalysts and cross...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006298
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
...) and phenolic urethane no-bake (PUNB) bonded sands within 2 min after pouring Experiment description Component mass fraction Mixture molecular weight, g/mol Binder system Pouring temperature H 2 O 2 N 2 CO CO 2 HC total (a) 2% PUCB Gray iron at 1446 °C (2635 °F) 0.068 0.013 0.041...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005100
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
..., transformation-induced plasticity, complex-phase, and martensite grades. The strength of these grades is also enhanced during the bake-hardening cycle following painting. The increase in strength increases with prior forming strain, unlike conventional bake-hardenable grades for which little additional hardening...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 24
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v24.a0006561
EISBN: 978-1-62708-290-7
... furnace bake-out Fig. 5 Damage to furnace from binder decomposition products condensing in the pumps due to a lack of cold traps or a burn-off system Fig. 12 Partial pressure argon used during a copper-braze cycle to suppress copper loss from evaporation Fig. 11 Vapor...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006051
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... for food use May be baked at a metal temperature ranging from 175 to 230 °C (350 to 450 °F). Coating must be applied in a thin film (approximately 0.025 mm, or 1 mil) and partially baked between coats. Multiple thin coats are necessary to allow water from the condensation reaction to be removed. Cured...
Book Chapter

Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005251
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
..., sodium silicate-carbon dioxide systems, and phosphate-bonded molds. Organically bonded systems include no-bake binders, heat-cured binders, and cold box binders. However, some molding processes do not use binders. Instead, the sand or mold aggregates are held together during pouring by the pattern...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006009
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... linear polyesters primarily are used in baking enamels for highly flexible coatings, such as those for coils and cans, with amino resins or other suitable hydroxyl-reactive cross linkers, but also may be used as physically drying binder components in paints. By reacting the terminal groups...
Book Chapter

Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005243
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... sand molding methods are shell molding and no-bake molding. The shell and no-bake methods are discussed in subsequent articles in this Volume. The base aggregates and types of binders are discussed in the article “Aggregates and Binders for Expendable Molds” in this Volume. Some advantages...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006533
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... binders can be heat, catalyst liquid, or gases. The systems are classified in two, based on the basic mechanism as self-hardening or trigger hardened. Self-hardening mixtures (also known as no bake and self-set) use a hardening chemical that is mixed with the sand and binder. The binder and hardener start...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006071
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... on January 29, 1927, stating that the “object of my invention was to produce resins of the polyhydric alcohol-polybasic acid class that can be fully hardened or set at ordinary room temperatures; that is, without baking, which will have greater hardness and elasticity and in general have more advantageous...