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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003824
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
...Abstract Abstract For chemical processing, niobium resists a wide variety of corrosive environments, including mineral acids, many organic acids, liquid metals, and most salt solutions. This article focuses on the mechanisms of corrosion resistance of niobium alloys in these environments...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 27 April 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v03.a0006244
EISBN: 978-1-62708-163-4
...Abstract Abstract This article is a compilation of ternary alloy phase diagrams for which niobium (Nb) is the first-named element in the ternary system. The diagrams are presented with element compositions in weight percent. The article includes 2 phase diagrams: Nb-Ti-W isothermal section...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 3
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 27 April 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v03.a0006187
EISBN: 978-1-62708-163-4
...Abstract Abstract This article is a compilation of binary alloy phase diagrams for which niobium (Nb) is the first named element in the binary pair. The diagrams are presented with element compositions in weight percent. The atomic percent compositions are given in a secondary scale. For each...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001110
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
...Abstract Abstract Niobium-titanium alloys (NbTi) became the superconductors of choice in the early 1960s, providing a viable alternative to the A-15 compounds and less ductile alloys of niobium-zirconium. This can be attributed to the relative ease of fabrication, better electrical properties...
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 6 Solubility of oxygen in niobium and tantalum. Curve A, niobium; curve B, tantalum. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 7 Solubility of nitrogen in niobium and tantalum. Curve A, niobium; curve B, tantalum. Source: Ref 18 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 12 φ 2 =45° sections of a niobium-vanadium microalloyed steel that was quenched after controlled rolling from soaking temperatures of (a) 1250 °C (2280 °F) and (b) 1050 °C (1920 °F) More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 28 Example of microsegregation in a weld of a niobium-bearing nickel-base superalloy. (a) Micrograph showing position of composition trace. (b) Corresponding electron probe microanalysis results showing niobium microsegregation. Source: Ref 33 , 42 More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 7 Schulz x-ray topograph of a niobium single crystal revealing its intrinsic microstructure. 8×. Source: Ref 13 More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 29 Topographs showing equi-inclination contours in a niobium crystal containing β-niobium hydride precipitates. Plate 0 is a multiple exposure. Plates 1 to 16 are single exposures taken 140 arc minutes of rotation about the [110] direction. OM is an optical micrograph showing hydride More
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 5 Tantalum-niobium production flowchart More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 1 Potential-pH equilibrium diagram for niobium-water at 25 °C (75 °F) More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 3 Isocorrosion curves of niobium alloys in hydrochloric acid, 0.05 mm/yr (2 mils/yr) lines More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 4 Potentiodynamic scan results of niobium and Nb-1Zr in 20% HCl at 100 °C (212 °F) with ferric ion. Saturated calomel electrode with scan rate of 0.3 mV/s More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 5 Potentiodynamic scan results of niobium and Nb-1Zr in 25% HCl at various temperatures. Scan rate of 0.3 mV/s More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 5 Platinum-clad niobium, used widely as an anode material in electroplating and in impressed-current cathodic protection. (a) Expanded anode. (b) Cross section showing 1 μm (0.04 mil) thick platinum cladding on a niobium substrate. Original magnification 500× More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 6 Sputter-deposited chromium-niobium and chromium-tantalum alloys. (a) Corrosion rates of alloys compared to pure chromium, niobium, and tantalum. (b) Polarization curves of sputter-deposited chromium-niobium alloys and pure chromium and niobium. The number corresponds to the atomic percent More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 51 Heat-tinted niobium alloy (C103) plate as viewed under differential interference contrast illumination. Some of the grains exhibit a second phase (note small, particle-like features) due to alloying additions. 65×. (P.E. Danielson) More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 72 Flow behavior for a niobium-vanadium microalloyed steel deformed in 17 passes in a torsion machine. The specimen temperatures are represented by the upper bold line. Source: Ref 131 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 74 Ferrite structure obtained in a niobium-vanadium microalloyed steel. (a) After 17 passes in the torsion machine. (b) After 17 passes in a production plate mill. Source: Ref 131 More