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nickel-rich austenitic stainless steel

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004182
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... Abstract This article provides the corrosion data for materials in hydrofluoric acid (HF) and anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF). These materials include carbon and low-alloy steels, austenitic stainless steels, nickel-rich austenitic stainless steels, nickel and nickel-base alloys, copper...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001407
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... and nickel equivalents on opposing axes provides a graphic depiction of the relationship between composition and microstructure for stainless steel welds. The Schaeffler diagram ( Fig. 1 ) has become known as the “roadmap” of stainless steels. The compositional ranges of the ferritic, martensitic, austenitic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001410
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
.... Temperatures shown are in °F. Source: Ref 8 In Fig. 2 , it can be seen that for approximately 60 to 70% Fe, which is the iron content of many of the austenitic stainless steels, the liquidus lies along the chromium/nickel ratio of approximately 1.5. Compositions on the nickel-rich side...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003162
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... hardfacing alloys can be divided into pearlitic steels, austenitic (manganese) steels, martensitic steels, high-alloy irons, and austenitic stainless steel. The types of nonferrous hardfacing alloys include cobalt-base/carbide-type alloys, laves phase alloys, nickel-base/boride-type alloys, and bronze type...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006067
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... austenitic stainless steels contain at least 16% Cr, and wrought alloys containing 16 to 19% Cr and approximately 9% Ni or more are austenitic at room temperature. Austenitizers other than nickel include manganese, carbon, and nitrogen. The total effect of all ferrite-forming elements can be expressed...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003664
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... to IGC in ferritic stainless steels have been incorporated into ASTM A 763 ( Ref 7 ) and for wrought Ni-rich, Cr-bearing alloys, into ASTM G 28 ( Ref 8 ). Acceptance criteria for ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, high nickel-base alloys, and aluminum alloys are summarized in Table 1...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005775
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... ) are those based on aluminum (aluminizing), chromium (chromizing), and silicon (siliconizing). Substrate materials include nickel- and cobalt-base superalloys, steels (including carbon, alloy, and stainless steels), and refractory metals and alloys. Multicomponent pack cementation coatings have been...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003813
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... performance is obtained with austenitic alloys containing 40 to 50% combined nickel and chromium. Figure 6 shows the behavior of the H-type grades. Fig. 5 Effect of chromium on oxidation resistance of cast steels. Specimens (13 mm, or 0.5 in., cubes) were exposed for 48 h at 1000 °C (1830 °F). Source...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003622
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... cross section. Source: Ref 3 Fig. 2 Concentration profile of chromium and nickel across the weld fusion boundary region of type 304 stainless steel. Source: Ref 4 Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weldments The corrosion problems commonly associated with welding...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005939
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
... and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. Hydrochloric acid is effective as an activating gas for a wide range of chromium-containing corrosion-resistant austenitic alloys, including stainless steels and nickel-base alloys, such as alloys 625 and 825. Processing Temperature Ranges and the Concept...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005658
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... but none for titanium, and both the nickel- and titanium-rich intermetallic phases. Fig. 2 Austenite-to-martensite transformation. (a) B2 austenite structure. (b) Four austenitic cubes are joined. An alternative tetragonal visualization of the austenite structure is shown by dashed lines. (c...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003789
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... not always result in homogeneous, well-diffused structures. Such heterogeneity is not necessarily detrimental and, in certain nickel steels and diffusion-alloyed steels, may be advantageous because the softer nickel-rich phases increase impact resistance and reduce the tendency toward ductility-limited...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003117
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... of the stainless steels used for high temperatures are austenitic grades with relatively high nickel contents, it is also necessary to be alert to the possibility of sulfidation attack. Corrosion in Specific Environments Selection of a suitable stainless steel for a specific environment requires...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001434
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
..., such as types 410, 420, and 440 ( Fig. 6 and 8 ). The addition of nickel to a martensitic alloy reduces the austenite-start temperature appreciably. For CA-6NM, it is about 640 °C (1180 °F). Fig. 10 Tempering response of martensitic stainless steels. Source: Ref 15 Tempering at temperatures...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005673
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... and oxidation resistance. Austenitic stainless steels have a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure. This structure is attained through the liberal use of austenitizing elements such as nickel, manganese, and nitrogen. Chromium content generally varies from 16 to 26%; nickel, up to approximately 35...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001413
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... 0.025 1.20 1.00 19.5–20.5 17.5–19.5 6.0–7.0 V; 0.18–0.24 N; 0.50–1.00 Cu CK-20 310 A 743 Austenite 0.20 2.00 2.00 23.0–27.0 19.0–22.0 … Nickel-chromium steel CN-3M … A 743 Austenite 0.03 2.00 1.00 20.0–22.0 23.0–27.0 4.5–5.5 Mo CN-7M … A 351, A 743, A 744...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001411
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... stainless steels WROUGHT DUPLEX STAINLESS STEELS (DSS) are two-phase alloys based on the iron-chromium-nickel system. These materials typically comprise approximately equal proportions of the body-centered cubic (bcc) ferrite and face-centered cubic (fcc) austenite phases in their microstructure...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003702
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
..., the newer ferritics, such as 26Cr-1Mo (UNS S44627) and 27Cr-3Mo-2Ni (UNS S44660), the nickel-rich high-performance alloys with 3 to 6% Mo (UNS N08825, N06007) and without molybdenum (UNS N08800), and the duplex ferritic-austenitic alloys, such as 26Cr-1.5Ni- 4.5Mo (UNS S32900) and 26Cr-5Ni-2Cu- 3.3Mo (UNS...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003617
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... tests. Tests for intergranular corrosion are summarized in a table in the article “Evaluating Intergranular Corrosion” in this Volume. This table includes ferritic stainless steels and nickel-rich chromium alloys as well as austenitic stainless steels. Several electrochemical tests based...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005985
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
...(a) and Fig. 2(b) , which show that for higher chromium alloys the range over which full austenitization can occur is further restricted. The variety of martensitic stainless steels would be very limited if only chromium and carbon were available as alloying elements, but fortunately nickel can again make...