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nickel alloys

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006265
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... Abstract This article describes the heat treatment of wrought solid-solution and precipitation-hardening alloys with a focus on the major families of wrought nickel alloys. It also provides information on the heat treatment of some representative solid-solution alloys in the Monel (Ni-Cu...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006261
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... Abstract This article provides information on nickel alloying elements, and the heat treatment processes of various nickel alloys for applications requiring corrosion resistance and/or high-temperature strength. These processes are homogenization, annealing, solution annealing, solution...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006266
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... Abstract Cast nickel-base alloys are used extensively in corrosive-media and high-temperature applications. This article briefly reviews the common types of heat treatments of nickel alloy castings: homogenization, stress relieving, in-process annealing, full annealing, solution annealing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006274
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... Abstract This article describes the different types of precipitation and transformation processes and their effects that can occur during heat treatment of various nonferrous alloys. The nonferrous alloys are aluminum alloys, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, nickel alloys, titanium alloys...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006287
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
..., zirconium, chromium, vanadium, scandium, nickel, tin, and bismuth. The article discusses the secondary phases in aluminum alloys, namely, nonmetallic inclusions, porosity, primary particles, constituent particles, dispersoids, precipitates, grain and dislocation structure, and crystallographic texture. It...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006276
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... hardening treatment is by quenching from high temperatures to produce martensitic-type (athermal or diffusionless) transformation. Quench-hardening alloys comprise aluminum bronzes, nickel-aluminum bronzes, and a few special copper-zinc alloys. Usually, quench-hardened alloys are tempered to improve...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006267
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... close-packed (hcp), which occurs at a temperature of approximately 422 °C (792 °F) ( Ref 2 ). Alloying elements such as iron, manganese, nickel, and carbon tend to stabilize the fcc structure and increase stacking-fault energy, whereas elements such as chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, and silicon tend to...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006250
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... Aluminum (99.0% +) 290 550 Aluminum alloys 320 600 Nickel (99.99%) 370 700 Nickel (99.4%) 590 1100 Nickel (30% Cu) 590 1100 Iron (electrolytic) 400 750 Low-carbon steel 540 1000 Magnesium (99.99%) 65 150 Magnesium alloys 540 1000 Zinc 10 50 Tin −5 25...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006257
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... than the solvent atom tend to segregate more heavily (for example, tungsten or molybdenum in nickel). Fig. 2 Portion of a hypothetical phase diagram showing equilibrium solidification of an alloy with a composition of C o Fig. 3 Portion of a hypothetical phase diagram showing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006275
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... solid lead, such as copper and nickel. Alloys that contain these elements can be processed so that no homogenization results; most of the strengthening that occurs is developed through dispersion hardening, with some solid-solution hardening taking place as a secondary effect. The resulting structure is...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006253
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
..., chromium, iron, nickel, cobalt, or hydrogen). Source: Ref 4 As noted, the average atomic diameter of titanium is favorable for substitutional alloying by various elements, such manganese, iron, vanadium, molybdenum, aluminum, tin, and zirconium. The diameters of these alloying elements do not...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006273
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
... specific change of the surface area chemical composition by means of additional elements of the PSE-III group (subgroup 3 on the periodic table), for example, chromium, iron, cobalt, or nickel ( Ref 32 , Ref 33 , 34 ), causes an increase in hardness up to 600 HV. Duplex surface treatment combining...