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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 7 Sintering begins by forming necks at the contact points between particles. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 5 Stress distribution at the neck of a tensile specimen. (a) Geometry of necked region. R is the radius of curvature of the neck; a is the minimum radius at the neck. (b) Stresses acting on element at point O . σ x is the stress in the axial direction; σ r is the radial stress; σ t More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 17 A neck in a round tensile bar. The neck starts to develop when the tensile strength is reached and becomes more pronounced as the test is continued. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 2 Necking in a formed part. (a) Start of necking is easier to feel than see. (b) Visible neck not yet split open. Source: Ref 1 . Reprinted with permission from MetalForming Magazine and the Precision Metalforming Association More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 11 Graphical interpretation of necking criterion. The point of necking at maximum load can be obtained from the true stress-true strain curve by finding (a) the point on the curve having a subtangent of unity or (b) the point where d σ/ d ε = σ. More
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Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 13 Stress distribution at the neck of a tensile specimen. (a) Geometry of necked region. R is the radius of curvature of the neck; a is the minimum radius at the neck. (b) Stresses acting on element at point O. σ x is the stress in the axial direction; σ r is the radial stress; σ t More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 2 Determination of the strain at the onset of necking during the tension test. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 3 Axial stress distribution at the symmetry plane of a necked portion of a tension specimen. Source: Ref 2 , 3 More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 8 A system for calculating riser neck connections. M s , volume/effective cooling surface of the largest section of the casting. M n , circumference of riser neck/cross section area of riser neck. Modulus of riser = 1.2 M n . Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 25 Flow of metal in the reduction of a drawn shell by necking. See text for details. More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 13 Comparison of forming limit curves (FLCs) at necking and fracture and an FLC for the incremental sheet forming process. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 34 Intergranular corrosion. (a) Sample from a cast stainless steel neck fitting. (b) Region adjacent to the intergranular corrosion revealing extensive σ-phase precipitation at grain boundaries; electrolytic etching using 10 N KOH. (c) Same area as (b) after repolishing and etching More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 23 (a) Rolling of a weld-neck flange in a radial-axial mill with controlled upward movement of the upper axial roll during rolling. (b) Theoretical (top) and practical (bottom) weld-neck flange preforms (dimensions given in millimeters; 1 in.=25.4 mm). See text for details. More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 August 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11A.a0006801
EISBN: 978-1-62708-329-4
...Abstract Abstract Sheet forming failures divert resources from normal business activities and have significant bottom-line impact. This article focuses on the formation, causes, and limitations of four primary categories of sheet forming failures, namely necks, fractures/splits/cracks, wrinkles...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003261
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
.... The point of necking at maximum load can be obtained from the true stress-true strain curve by finding the point on the curve having a subtangent of unity. The article concludes with an overview of the ductility measurements performed by notch tensile and compression tests. mechanical behavior...
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 12 Hot tensile results for Ti-17 alloy (Ti-5Al-2Sn-2Zr-4Mo) at 815 °C (1500 °F) and strain rate of 1 s −1 . (a) Damage contours at necking. Black area at left of figure represents a one-quarter view of tensile sample. Necked region of tensile sample is between 0.7 and 0.8 in. on vertical More
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Published: 01 January 1996
) Macroscopic deformation takes place before fracture by mode III brittle fracture. A limited reduction in area is obtained in a tensile test, but fracture propagation by cleavage or BIF takes place prior to necking. (d) Ductile tensile fracture propagation is preceded by necking. Microscopic voids form More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 7 SEM micrographs of Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V modular connections for a total hip replacement device from a retrieved device (due to ceramic head fracture). This modular connection consisted of a femoral neck taper onto which was placed a Ti-6Al-4V “thimble” to allow a ceramic head to attach More
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Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 18 Schematic illustrating the relationship between the tensile true stress/true strain (dotted line) and engineering stress/engineering strain (solid line). For engineering strains less than the necking strain, the true stress-strain curve is displaced vertically and to the left relative More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006775
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... copper (99.9998%) and notched high-strain-rate-loaded specimens to prevent necking ( Ref 39 ). Results confirm the premise that the fracture mechanism is by void nucleation, even when no particles can be detected in the voids. Results also indicate that when grain boundaries are present, fracture...