1-20 of 469 Search Results for

necking

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 87 Biaxial stress ratios that permit no necking, diffuse necking, and local necking. Source: Ref 32 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 11 Graphical interpretation of necking criterion. The point of necking at maximum load can be obtained from the true stress-true strain curve by finding (a) the point on the curve having a subtangent of unity or (b) the point where d σ/ d ε = σ. More
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 87 Biaxial stress ratios that permit no necking, diffuse necking, and local necking. Source: Ref 32 More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 2 Necking in a formed part. (a) Start of necking is easier to feel than see. (b) Visible neck not yet split open. Source: Ref 1 . Reprinted with permission from MetalForming Magazine and the Precision Metalforming Association More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 25 Local and diffuse necking in copper and in 200 nickel. Width-to-thickness ratio ∼24:1. Note that fracture initiation has occurred in the local necks at the edges of the specimens. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 13 Comparison of forming limit curves (FLCs) at necking and fracture and an FLC for the incremental sheet forming process. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 25 Flow of metal in the reduction of a drawn shell by necking. See text for details. More
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 2 Determination of the strain at the onset of necking during the tension test. Source: Ref 2 More
Image
Published: 30 November 2018
Fig. 5 Joining by crimping. (a) Beading. (b) Necking More
Image
Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 25 Local diffuse necking in copper and in Monel 400. Width-to-thickness ratio, ~24:1. Note that fracture initiation occurred in the local necks at the edges of the specimens. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 13 Stress distribution at the neck of a tensile specimen. (a) Geometry of necked region. R is the radius of curvature of the neck; a is the minimum radius at the neck. (b) Stresses acting on element at point O. σ x is the stress in the axial direction; σ r is the radial stress; σ More
Image
Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 5 Stress distribution at the neck of a tensile specimen. (a) Geometry of necked region. R is the radius of curvature of the neck; a is the minimum radius at the neck. (b) Stresses acting on element at point O . σ x is the stress in the axial direction; σ r is the radial stress; σ More
Image
Published: 01 January 1997
Fig. 17 A neck in a round tensile bar. The neck starts to develop when the tensile strength is reached and becomes more pronounced as the test is continued. Source: Ref 4 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 26 Diffuse and localized necks in an 1100 aluminum sheet tensile specimen. Source: Ref 51 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 45 Sheet samples with an initial w / t ratio of 6. (a) Single local neck (sample with tensile strength, 1586 MPa, or 230 ksi). (b) Two local necks (sample tensile strength, 827 MPa, or 120 ksi). (c) Fracture of specimen in (a) More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 28 Stress-corrosion cracking liner of cast neck liner. (a) Illustration of neck liner removed from a pulp digester vessel. Note the abrupt change in cross section that led to a caked-on buildup. Dimensions given in millimeters (inches). (b) Extensive SCC into the 317 plate on the inner More
Image
Published: 01 November 1995
Fig. 3 Bottle parts identification for (a) narrow neck and (b) wide mouth ware More
Image
Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 36 Scanning electron micrographs of the neck formation due to sintering. The spheres (33 μm diam) were sintered at 1030 °C for 30 min in vacuum. Courtesy of Randall M. German, The Pennsylvania State University More
Image
Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 24 General design rules for riser necks used in iron casting applications (side view and top view, respectively). (a) General type of side riser. (b) Side riser for plate casting. (c) Top round riser. Source: Ref 33 More
Image
Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 7 Sintering begins by forming necks at the contact points between particles. Source: Ref 1 More