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multiaxial creep ductility

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0009003
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... encountered in multiaxial stress states. The construction of a processing map based on deformation mechanisms is also discussed. ductile fracture multiaxial stress stress-strain curve workability WORKABILITY refers to the relative ease with which a metal can be shaped through plastic deformation...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003225
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
...) Ductile overload Brittle overload Fatigue Corrosion Wear Creep Visual, 1 to 50× (fracture surface) Necking or distortion in direction consistent with applied loads Dull, fibrous fracture Shear lips Little or no distortion Flat fracture Bright or coarse texture, crystalline...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003024
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... or by conducting multiaxial creep experiments ( Ref 14 , 15 , 24 , 25 ). Commonly used definitions of an effective stress may be derived from the von Mises effective stress, σ e : (Eq 12) σ e 2 = 3 2   S i j S i j where S ij is the stress deviation tensor, and...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.9781627081764
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003025
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... Elastic modulus Tensile strength Maximum strength/density Elongation at break, % GPa 10 6 psi MPa ksi (km/s) 2 (kft/s) 2 Ductile steel 200 30 350–800 50–120 0.1 1 0.2–0.5 Cast aluminum alloys 65–72 9–10 130–300 19–45 0.1 1 0.01–0.14 Polymers 0.1–21 0.02–30 5–190...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004003
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... another processing technique that may be used to obtain increased toughness and improved creep and crack-growth resistance compared to alpha-beta processing. However, such techniques may lead to rapid beta grain growth and concomitant reductions in tensile strength and ductility. Thus, TMP processes to...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004017
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... determination of the extent of possible plastic deformation before fracture (ductility). Therefore, a complete description of the workability of a material is specified by its flow stress dependence on processing variables (for example, strain, strain rate, preheat temperature, and die temperature), its failure...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003224
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... definition of tensile properties for a material, but these data only partly indicate the inherent mechanical resistance to failure in service. Except for those situations where gross yielding or highly ductile fracture represents limiting failure conditions, tensile and yield strengths often are insufficient...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005674
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... as follows: Property Beta forging of Strength Lower Ductility Lower Fracture toughness Higher Fatigue life Lower Fatigue crack growth rate Lower Creep strength Higher Aqueous stress-corrosion cracking resistance Higher Fig. 5 Effects of thermomechanical...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003008
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... considerations, however, are important to the successful production of parts. Acrylics exhibit room-temperature creep characteristics similar to those of unfilled engineering thermoplastics. The initial tensile strengths of acrylics are high. However, under long-term high-stress loading, acrylics have a...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.9781627082952
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004000
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... dramatically increases high-temperature strength and creep resistance but radically reduces ductility. Thus, additions of a third element, such as niobium, tantalum, chromium, vanadium, and manganese, to either single-phase γ or two-phase γ+α-2 alloys are made for enhanced strengthening and ductility. By...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005654
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... phenomena are discussed in this section. Fatigue failures have been studied by materials scientists for many decades. In a macroscopic sense, even a normally ductile material fails in a manner that is basically brittle under the action of fatigue loading. Fatigue failures involve repeated dynamic cyclic...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003063
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... properties: Continuous fiber (can be woven, braided, etc.) Diameter of less than 20 μm (50 μm for monofilament) Room-temperature strength of 2.1 GPa (305 ksi) Creep resistance of less than 1% at 520 MPa (75 ksi) and 1200 °C (2190 °F) for 24,000 h CTE similar to that of the matrix Elastic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.9781627081955
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003047
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... assemblies are subject to some continuous low level of stress, either from externally applied loads, such as the weight of the assembly itself, or from residual stresses from the adhesive solidification process. Therefore, creep in the assembly might be a major factor that is not uncovered in a rapid...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005431
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... another class of nonlinear problems. Problems of creep, relaxation, hysteresis, phase change, and residual stress fall into this category. Fortunately, most nonlinear material models used in finite-element solutions carry over from disciplines that predate finite-element technology (e.g., theory of...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05a.9781627081719
EISBN: 978-1-62708-171-9