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molybdenum powders

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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 7 Compaction of 99.9% pure molybdenum powder having FSSS = 4.5 μm. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 15 June 2020
Fig. 1 Spherical morphology of (a) molybdenum and (b) tungsten powders used for additive manufacturing via selective laser melting More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006124
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract This article discusses the pressing and sintering of various refractory metal powders for the production of intermediate products as well as special cases of finished products. The metal powders considered include tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, niobium and their alloys, as well...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006121
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
.... The effects of processing conditions on the physical and chemical properties of tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, niobium, and rhenium powders are reviewed. chemical properties molybdenum powders niobium powders physical properties powder production refractory metal powders rhenium powders tantalum...
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Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 8 Fractional sintered density of molybdenum compacts as a function of fractional green density. The powder used was a 99.9% pure molybdenum powder with FSSS = 4.6 μm. Compaction pressures ranged from 100 to 500 MPa (14,500 to 72,500 psi). Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 12 Scanning electron microscope images of common metal powders and additives used for manufacturing powdered metal components. (a) Ethylene bis stearamide wax lubricant. (b) Molybdenum powder. (c) Nickel powder. (d) Graphite powder. (e) Copper powder. (f) Atomized iron powder More
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Published: 30 June 2023
Fig. 14 Case study showing cobalt-chrome-molybdenum (CCM) (ASTM F75) powder degradation following reuse in an EOS M280 system, including shift for 10× reused powder to higher particle size distribution (PSD) and particles that are visibly oxidized (black color) for 10× and 30× reused powder More
Image
Published: 30 September 2015
Fig. 4 Scanning electron micrographs of (a) standard and (b) fine grades of molybdenum powder More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006123
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract This article focuses on the selection, properties, and applications of powder metallurgy refractory metals and their alloys, including tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum, niobium, and rhenium. molybdenum niobium powder metallurgy refractory metals rhenium tantalum tungsten...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 24
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v24.a0006583
EISBN: 978-1-62708-290-7
... Abstract Tungsten, molybdenum, and cemented carbide parts can be produced using several additive manufacturing technologies. This article classifies the most relevant technologies into two groups based on the raw materials used: powder-bed methods, such as selective laser melting, electron beam...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006087
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
..., copper, tungsten, and molybdenum powders from their respective oxides are well-established commercial processes. Detailed process descriptions for these oxide-reduced powders can be found in the articles “Production of Powder Metallurgy Carbon and Low-Alloy Steels” , “Production of Copper Powders...