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molybdenum disulfide

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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 7 Setup for applying dry molybdenum disulfide to both sides of electrical sheet More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0004032
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... Abstract This article lists functions of lubricants common to the majority of applications and processes. It discusses the lubricant candidates widely used in forging: conversion coatings with soaps (stearate compounds) and molybdenum disulfide for cold forging; oil-based thick, film oil...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006103
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... for the materials requiring lower torque. Both free-machining agents reduce drill torque compared to the base FC-0205 composition. The addition of 0.35% MnS produces lower drill torque than molybdenum disulfide. Mean drill torque for 50 holes Table 1 Mean drill torque for 50 holes Material Torque...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005167
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
..., and molybdenum disulphide, used in the forming of refractory metals. formability graphite heat treatment mechanical properties molybdenum molybdenum disulfide niobium rolling silicones tantalum titanium-zirconium-molybdenum alloys tungsten REFRACTORY METALS are generally worked in small...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14a.a0003994
EISBN: 978-1-62708-185-6
... forging. Molybdenum disulfide and colloidal graphite are suitable lubricants for small forgings. Molybdenum and TZM are usually forged in the temperature regime of 870 to 1260 °C (1600 to 2300 °F). Using typical gas- or oil-fired preheat furnaces found in forge shops, there is no need for concern...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005159
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... include molybdenum disulfide, graphite, sodium carbonate, Teflon, nylon, and other solids in a carrier. Solid films are often preferred so that the film thickness can be controlled by application rather than by process conditions alone. Such films also offer the possibility of differential...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006377
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... input for desorption to occur. The thermally activated desorption quantities were found to have constant molar ratios of water to molybdenum disulfide for both film thicknesses (0.1 and 0.9 μm). The room-temperature sorption values linearly increased with an increasing coating thickness, but the molar...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003180
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... and the lubricant. Table 2 lists the lubricants ordinarily used in forming stainless steel by various processes. Except for the special-purpose lubricants graphite and molybdenum disulfide, they are listed in the approximate order of increasing ability to reduce galling and friction. The ratings in Table 2...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005119
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
...” in this Volume. Molybdenum Disulfide Molybdenum disulfide is a good lubricant for the blanking and piercing of electrical sheet. The amount used is usually so small that no removal is required. When there is an excess, it can be removed by immersing the sheet for 4 to 5 min in a dilute solution...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006407
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... common solid lubricants, such as graphite and molybdenum disulfide, are layered lattice compounds that shear easily along preferred planes of their structure. Molybdenum disulfide has weak van der Waals forces between sulfur bonds, giving the material a characteristic relatively low coefficient...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006370
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... °C (480 °F), respectively. Cold Working Lubricants Cold working lubricants are often based on organic compounds such as fatty and petroleum oils, although inorganic compounds such as molybdenum disulfide are used in severe applications. Cold working lubricants may be either liquid or solid...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001311
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... of providing double protection against scratching and scoring. During hot forming operations and metal surface stretching, some voiding and penetration occurs, creating a titanium oxide on the surface. The contaminant then consists of organic bond or residues, graphite, molybdenum disulfide, silicates...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006097
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... other lubricants that are also selected for use with stainless steel powders are zinc stearate and molybdenum disulfide. Use of zinc stearate is restricted in North America because of the harmful effects of zinc-bearing residues on the environment. Molybdenum disulfide has superior stability at high...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005777
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
... oil and grease Chips and cutting fluids Rust and scale Miscellaneous surface contaminants Pigmented compounds, including graphite, molybdenum disulfide, and so on, are often used in lubricants, heat treating, and hot forming protected coatings and are left on the surface after shape...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003157
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
...—such as in an environment having a dew point of −20 °C (−4 °F) or higher. Alternatively, lubrication can be provided by very thin oil films, although excessive oil vapor causes over filming. It can also be provided by molybdenum disulfide, and other chalcogenides of molybdenum, tungsten, and niobium. Oxygen, sulfur...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006121
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... of viable ore bodies ranges between 0.01 and 0.25%. Molybdenum disulfide is concentrated by flotation and converted to an impure technical oxide (MoO 3 ) by roasting in air at temperatures between 500 and 650 °C (930 and 1200 °F). The sulfur is oxidized and removed as gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) ( Ref 20...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003177
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... effectiveness of four types of lubricants for various functions. Some of the more important additives include emulsifiers, extreme-pressure (EP) additives, thickeners, solid lubricants (e.g., graphite and molybdenum disulfide), antifoaming agents, corrosion inhibitors, and antimicrobial agents. Relative...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001070
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
... at the inside bore of the bearing, permitting load capacity to be increased by a factor of 10 to 20. This radical improvement was attributed to the fine porous layer that prevented air introduction and subsequent oil loss. In 1980, Kohno et al. ( Ref 4 ) described phosphorus, molybdenum disulfide...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001313
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... for finishing the product of these metals. Cleaning and Polishing of Tantalum and Niobium Alkaline Cleaning When oxide scale is combined with grease, graphite, molybdenum disulfide, and other lubricants on the workpieces of tantalum and niobium, an alkaline cleaning process is usually used...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 14B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v14b.a0005146
EISBN: 978-1-62708-186-3
... react unfavorably with titanium when it is heated, although molybdenum disulfide suspended in a volatile carrier, colloidal graphite, and graphite-molybdenum disulfide mixtures have been successfully used. Boron nitride slurries also are used. If the lubricant reacts with oxidation products to produce...