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molten salt

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001225
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... Abstract Molten salt baths are anhydrous, fused chemical baths used at elevated temperatures for a variety of industrial cleaning applications. This article discusses their applications in paint stripping, polymer removal, casting cleaning, glass removal, and plasma/flame spray removal...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003581
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... Abstract Molten salts, in contrast to aqueous solutions in which an electrolyte (acid, base, salt) is dissolved in a molecular solvent, are essentially completely ionic. This article begins with an overview of the thermodynamics of cells and classification of electrodes for molten salts...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003609
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... Abstract This article discusses two general mechanisms of corrosion in molten salts. One is the metal dissolution caused by the solubility of the metal in the melt. The second and most common mechanism is the oxidation of the metal to ions. Specific examples of the types of corrosion expected...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003593
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... to study fused-salt corrosion. fused salt fused salt corrosion hot corrosion molten salt corrosion sodium sulfate system THE OPERATION of high-temperature engineering systems, despite their associated materials problems, is inherent to advanced technologies that strive to gain an advantage...
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 2 Cutaway view of a salt bath furnace incorporating an agitated molten salt bath and a sludge settling zone More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 5 Schematic of salt bath furnace. Agitated molten salt bath with sludge settling zone More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 33 Quenching in a molten salt occurs at a uniform rate, showing typical cooling and cooling rate curves for molten salt at 255 °C (495 °F). No agitation or water addition. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 34 Cooling rates of a silver ball 20 mm (0.8 in.) in diameter in molten salt at various temperatures. Source: Ref 5 More
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Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 2 Typical cooling and cooling-rate curves for a nitrate-base molten salt bath at 255 °C (495 °F). No agitation or water addition. Average cooling rate from 650 to 260 °C (1200 to 500 °F) was 33.6 °C/s (60.5 °F/s). Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 2 Flow diagram for hafnium extraction by distillation from molten salt More
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Published: 01 January 1994
Fig. 3 Schematic of an enclosed molten salt bath cleaning line More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 16 Flow chart of operations for molten-salt descaling, neutralizing pickling, and final pickling of titanium alloys Solution No. Type of solution Composition of solution Operating temprature Cycle time, min °C °F 1 Descale 60–90% NaOH, rem NaNO 3 and Na 2 CO 3 425 More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 14 Schematic of molten salt test apparatus with test specimen. Source: Ref 101 More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 3 Effect of molten salt corrosion on nickel-base and stainless steel alloys. In all four examples, chromium depletion (dealloying) was the result of prolonged exposure. Accompanying chromium depletion was the formation of subsurface voids, which did not connect with the surface More
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Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 5 Malleable-iron-to-steel fitting assembly dip brazed in molten salt ( Example 3 ). Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Principal types of furnaces used for molten-salt-bath dip-brazing applications. (a) and (b) externally heated; (c) and (d) internally heated More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 23 Effect of molten salt on hot corrosion at 700 °C (1290 °F) in air. With the lower melting temperatures of salt mixtures, the corrosion rate increases with increasing volume fraction of liquid. Courtesy of Z. Tang and B. Gleeson, University of Pittsburgh More
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Published: 01 February 2024
Fig. 26 Effect of agitation on the quench severity of molten salt. Adapted from Ref 3 More
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Published: 01 February 2024
Fig. 28 Schematic illustration of the Liscic molten salt bath circulation system. Source: Ref 43 More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003587
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... Abstract Molten salts, or fused salts, can cause corrosion by the solution of constituents of the container material, selective attack, pitting, electrochemical reactions, mass transport due to thermal gradients, and reaction of constituents and impurities of the molten salt with the container...