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molecular weight

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003848
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... of materials known as polymers that acquire their properties and strength from their molecular weight, chain entanglements, and crystalline regions. This article focuses on the use of elastomers as seals and describes its performance capabilities from the point of a sealant. The important technical concepts...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003525
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
.... The descriptions of the analytical techniques are supplemented by a series of case studies that include pertinent visual examination results and the corresponding images that aid in the characterization of the failures. The article describes the methods used for determining the molecular weight of a plastic resin...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005659
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... Abstract This article provides a summary of biocompatibility or biological response of metals, ceramics, and polymers used in medical implant, along with their clinical issues. The polymers include ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene, nonresorbable polymer, and resorbable polymers...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005678
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... Abstract Total joint replacement in orthopedic surgery can be achieved by excision, interposition, and replacement arthroplasty. This article details the most common materials used in total replacement synovial joints, such as metals, ceramics, and ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1994
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05.a0001278
EISBN: 978-1-62708-170-2
... be cured with melamine formaldehyde resins to obtain useful coatings for elastomeric substrates. The materials described above are high-molecular-weight polymers and thus are not suitable for use in high-solids coatings. In patents by Etzell et al. ( Ref 7 , 8 , 9 ), acrylic polymers modified...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003025
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... ′ is the storage shear modulus. Molecular weight, cross-linking, crystallinity, and plasticization can affect the dynamic modulus. As a general rule, these factors affect G ′ the same way they affect complex modulus. In fact, one can convert shear modulus to complex modulus, and vice versa, at least from...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005676
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... properties. The properties of common synthetic medical polymers vary widely and are governed by their chemical composition, molecular weight, molecular architecture, and morphology. More detailed information on polymer chemistry, processing, and properties can be found in the Selected References section...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006009
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... polyesters in terms of toughness and chemical resistance ( Ref 2 ). Toughness and increased tensile elongation properties in vinyl ester resins come from the epoxy resin backbone. Depending on the epoxy backbone used, the molecular weight of the vinyl ester resin can be changed, which in turn can vary...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006077
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
.... There is a relatively large number of epoxy coating systems, because there are a number of epoxy resins of different molecular weights and compositions, as well as a number of cross-linking agents that co-polymerize with those epoxy resins. Each is discussed in some detail, although materials suppliers always...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003692
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
...- and isophthalic acids are the most common polybasic acids used in alkyd preparation. The main advantage of ter- and isophthalic acids compared with phthalic anhydrides is that they provide polymers with a higher molecular weight and higher viscosity. Furthermore, they exhibit somewhat faster-drying, more flexible...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003432
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... to define and fingerprint the molecular weight distribution of the resin. Reaction advancement can also be determined by this method. Knowledge of gel time and viscosity is useful for predicting resin shop life and for determining resin cure characteristics. It is also useful for looking at an increase...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 18
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 December 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v18.a0006405
EISBN: 978-1-62708-192-4
... the most commonly used hydrocarbon group. In some dispersants, the hydrocarbon moiety is derived from a high-molecular-weight polymer, such as olefin copolymer, polyacrylate, or styrene-ester polymer. Such dispersants can function as dispersants as well as viscosity improvers and are appropriately called...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 November 1995
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.emde.a0003023
EISBN: 978-1-62708-200-6
... analysis; TGA, thermogravimetric analysis; PVC, polyvinyl chloride; ABS, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene; PET, polyethylene terephthalate. Experimental conditions: Heating rate = 10 °C/min (18 °F/min); N 2 flow = 50 cm 3 /min (3 in. 3 /min) in DSC, TGA, and TMA; weight = 14–21 mg (0.21–0.32 gr) in DSC...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003550
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... the macromolecular chains, reducing molecular weight, and diminishing polymer properties as a result. Each of these effects is examined in subsequent paragraphs. References 1. Stevens M.P. , Polymer Chemistry: An Introduction , 2nd ed. , Oxford University Press , 1990 , p 43...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003365
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... calorimetry at heating rate of 20 °C/min (36 °F/min). (c) Determined on powdered sample cured in a sealed aluminum pan for 1 h at 371 °C (700 °F). (d) Molecular weight ( M n ) 5000 g/mol. Source: Ref 14 Tensile properties of phenylethynyl-containing polyimides Table 15 Tensile properties...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006044
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... rate is controlled to manage the temperature of the resulting exothermic reaction. Because acrylic polymerizations are inhibited by oxygen, the reaction is done under an inert atmosphere such as nitrogen. The resulting resins can have molecular weights ( M w ) from about 5,000 up to approximately...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1986
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0001776
EISBN: 978-1-62708-178-8
... in analyzing mixtures of organic compounds. The mass spectrometer portion of the instrument is a powerful tool for determining the structure of a compound. With it, information on the molecular weight and the pieces that constitute the molecules in a sample can be obtained. However, the mass spectrometer...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1986
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0001738
EISBN: 978-1-62708-178-8
... the molecular weight of the gas), fractionation of the sample in the introduction system can occur. That is, the composition of the gas in the introduction system changes with time as the gas flows through the leak. In noncomputerized gas mass spectrometry, an assumption used to deal with fractionation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 21
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v21.a0003362
EISBN: 978-1-62708-195-5
... ). Solid acrylonitrile-butadiene rubbers have higher molecular weights than the liquid rubbers. Loadings are generally low due to a rapid increase in resin viscosity as rubber content increases. They can be dissolved directly into the epoxy or addition can be facilitated with a solvent that is later...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 8
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v08.a0003318
EISBN: 978-1-62708-176-4
... are sensitive to a number of molecular variables including molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, crystallinity, chain entanglement density, and crosslinking ( Ref 3 , 5 , 20 , and 21 ). In general, as the molecular weight of the polymer is increased, the fatigue resistance of the polymer...