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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0009079
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... Abstract This article describes the microcrack analysis of composite materials using bright-field illumination, polarized light, dyes, dark-field illumination, and epi-fluorescence. bright-field illumination composite materials dark-field illumination dyes epi-fluorescence microcrack...
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 17 Example of typical microcracks in martensite. 1.13% C steel, original magnification: 2200×. Source: Ref 34 More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 15 Microcracks in martensite plates of an Fe-1.86C alloy. Light micrograph. Source: Ref 42 More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 16 Microcracks in the compound layer. Transmission electron micrograph; original magnification: 10,000× More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 15 Pitting and surface microcracks on the tooth flank of an oil-lubricated nylon driving gear. 37×. Source: Ref 53 More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 24 Network of microcracks (arrows) on the outside diameter surface of the sleeve (lower portion of the micrograph). More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 6 Plate martensite formed in an Fe-1.86C alloy. Arrows indicate microcracks. Source: Ref 6 . Reprinted with permission More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 1 Cross section of a polished composite showing areas of the microcracks partially filled with epoxy mounting resin. Incomplete impregnation of the mounting resin can cause edge rounding and also fill the unprotected edges with grinding and polishing debris. Unimpregnated areas More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 8 Predicted nonlinear growth of microcracks for 1045 steel for four different constant-amplitude fatigue lives. Completely reversed (a) torsional fatigue and (b) uniaxial fatigue. Source: Ref 58 More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 9 Microcracks in etched weldment cross section revealed by macro visual inspection. Courtesy of A. Antonatos More
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Published: 01 August 2018
Fig. 3 (a) Optical micrograph of microcracks observed in Hastelloy caused by hot cracking perpendicular to the build direction. Source: Ref 12 . (b) Optical micrograph of hot tearing cracks in nickel superalloy CM247LC with crack-dense regions corresponding to the heat source scanning More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 13 da / dN -Δ K curves of microcracks in Ti-6Al-4V. CL, coarse lamellar; EQ, equiaxed. Source: Ref 8 More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 14 da / dN -Δ K curves of microcracks in TIMETAL 1100. (a) Fully lamellar microstructure. Effect of prior β grain size. (b) Duplex microstructure. Effect of α p content. Source: Ref 20 , 21 More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 18 da / dN -Δ K curves of microcracks in Ti-3Al-8V-6Cr-4Mo-4Zr. SHT, solution heat treated. Source: Ref 25 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 10 Microcracks in a composite material that are difficult to observe using epi-bright-field illumination. (a) Bright-field illumination, 25× objective. (b) Same location viewed after applying a fluorescent penetrant dye (Magnaflux Zyglo) to the surface and back-polishing. Epi-fluorescence More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 11 Composite part containing microcracks that extend to the surfacing film, primer, and paint layers. (a) Slightly uncrossed polarized light was used to contrast the paint layer (10× objective). (b) A fluorescent penetration dye (Magnaflux Zyglo) was applied on the surface of the specimen More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 14 Thermoplastic fiber-reinforced composite with the microcracks dyed using Magnaflux Spotcheck SKL-H. Dark-field illumination, 25× objective More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 1 Microcracks in a carbon fiber composite laminate due to thermal cycling. (a) Resin-rich region in the composite. Slightly uncrossed polarized light, 10× objective. (b) Resin-rich region containing a large void. Slightly uncrossed polarized light, 10× objective More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 6 Microcracks in a glass and thermoplastic fiber hybrid composite. Red penetration dye (Magnaflux Spotcheck SKL-H, Magnaflux Corp.), dark-field illumination, 25× objective More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 7 Microcracks in a thermoplastic-matrix glass fiber composite. Red penetration dye (DYKEM Steel Red layout fluid, Illinois Tool Works, Inc.), dark-field illumination, 25× objective More