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microbiologically induced corrosion

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004169
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... Abstract This article describes the commonly observed forms of airplane corrosion, namely: general corrosion, exfoliation corrosion, pitting corrosion, microbiologically induced corrosion, galvanic corrosion, filiform corrosion, crevice corrosion, stress-corrosion cracking, and fretting...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006349
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
... reviews the various forms of corrosions, such as graphitic corrosion, fretting corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, intergranular attack, erosion-corrosion, microbiologically induced corrosion, and stress-corrosion cracking. It discusses the four general categories of coatings used on cast irons...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003810
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... corrosion martensite microbiologically induced corrosion molybdenum nickel pearlite pitting corrosion silicon stress-corrosion cracking titanium vanadium CAST IRON is a generic term that identifies a large family of ferrous alloys. Cast irons are primarily alloys of iron that contain more...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003823
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... on zirconium. The delayed hydride cracking of zirconium is also described. The article provides information on the resistance of zirconium to various types of corrosion, including pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion, intergranular corrosion, galvanic corrosion, microbiologically induced corrosion, erosion...
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 2 Forms of corrosion in aircraft. (a) Exfoliation corrosion. (b) Microbiologically induced corrosion on fuel tank access door. (c) (d) Galvanic corrosion under aluminum-nickel bronze bushing More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 12 Forms of corrosion in aircraft. (a) Exfoliation corrosion. (b) Microbiologically induced corrosion on fuel tank access door. (c) Bushing assembly. (d) Galvanic corrosion under aluminum-nickel bronze bushing, seen with bushing removed. See the article “Corrosion in Commercial Aviation More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 25 (a) Partitioned tube as-received. (b) Deposit on tube interior. MIC, microbiologically induced corrosion. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 26 Macrographs of tube inner surface. (a) Tubercles. MIC, microbiologically induced corrosion. Original magnification: 18×. (b) Pits after removing the tubercles. Original magnification: 15×. Source: Ref 7 More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 12 Micrograph of 19 mm (0.75 in.) copper piping in a closed-loop water system with microbiologically induced corrosion and erosion of the weak oxide layer. Original magnification: 20×. Courtesy of MDE Engineers, Inc. More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 11 Micrograph of large bacteria (SRB) that are rod shaped. Note this is a chain of two bacteria cultured from microbiologically induced corrosion product of the pipe failure shown in Fig. 12 . 400×. Courtesy of MDE Engineers, Inc. More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 11 Micrograph of large bacteria (sulfur-reducing bacteria) that are rod shaped. Note this is a chain of two bacteria cultured from microbiologically induced corrosion product of the pipe failure shown in Fig. 12 . Original magnification: 400×. Courtesy of MDE Engineers, Inc. More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004221
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... corrosion of aluminum is seen in a military cockpit ( Fig. 11 ) and, in a commercial aircraft ( Fig. 12a ). This figure also presents microbiologically induced corrosion associated with jet fuel ( Fig. 12b ) and galvanic corrosion ( Fig. 12c , d). Because aircraft are a complex combination of many materials...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003603
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... corrosion, and microbiologically influenced corrosion, which fit under the classification of corrosion that is not influenced by any outside process. It also explains mechanically assisted degradation and environmentally induced cracking, which fit under the classification of corrosion that is influenced...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006788
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... Abstract This article focuses on the mechanisms of microbiologically influenced corrosion as a basis for discussion on the diagnosis, management, and prevention of biological corrosion failures in piping, tanks, heat exchangers, and cooling towers. It begins with an overview of the scope...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003637
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... There are three general sets of conditions under which localized biological corrosion of austenitic stainless steel occurs ( Fig. 15 ). These are illustrated by two generalized case histories. Typical examples of microbiologically induced localized corrosion of stainless steel are shown in Fig. 16 . Fig. 15...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003556
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... Abstract This article focuses on the mechanisms of microbially induced or influenced corrosion (MIC) of metallic materials as an introduction to the recognition, management, and prevention of microbiological corrosion failures in piping, tanks, heat exchangers, and cooling towers. It discusses...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003670
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... Abstract This article explains how an engineer might go about assessing the risk of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in an industrial situation. It describes the systems that are susceptible to the effects of MIC by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The article discusses the effects...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004130
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... to values below 4.0. The localized corrosion mechanism of the steel fragments was in many cases pitting, with pits inside pits, indicating multiple initiation sites. In other cases, tunneling was observed. Both types of localized corrosion are consistent with microbiological acid-induced corrosion...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006352
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
... of torsion SMB sodium metabisul te MAZ machining-affected zone SN sphericity nodularity MD magnetic disc S-N stress/number of cycles curve MF medium frequency SS SGI solution-strengthened spheroidal graphite iron MFD maximum Feret s diameter SV solid/vapor MIC microbiologically induced corrosion t time n...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004102
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
..., tuberculation, and under-deposit corrosion (UDC), microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), galvanic corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and dealloying. General corrosion rates vary greatly because some waters are much more aggressive than others. Localized forms of corrosion, pitting, concentration...