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microbial biofilms

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003637
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
..., microbiological, chemical, and electrochemical. It provides information on the microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of irons and steels, passive alloys (austenitic stainless steels), aluminum alloys, copper alloys, and composites. The article reviews the formation of microbial biofilms and macrofouling...
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 22 UNS A93003 aluminum coupons after galvanic corrosion test and removal of corrosion products. (a) Coupled to stainless steel cathode with natural microbial biofilm. (b) Coupled to control stainless steel cathode without biofilm. (c) As originally prepared prior to immersion. Source More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 20 Corrosion currents for galvanic couples of UNS C1100 copper anodes versus UNS N08367 stainless steel cathodes with and without (control) the influence of natural marine microbial biofilms. Source: Ref 58 More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 21 Corrosion currents for galvanic couples of UNS A93003 aluminum alloy anodes versus UNS N08367 stainless steel cathodes with and without (control) the influence of natural marine microbial biofilms. Source: Ref 58 More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 13 Microbial community coupled to the corrosion of steel in a biofilm taken from location 2 in Fig. 12 . Adapted from Ref 22 under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). Copyright © 2014 Mand, Park, Jack, and Voordouw More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003647
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... Abstract Corrosion resulting from the presence and activities of microbes on metals and metal alloys is generally referred to as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). This article describes the biofilm formation and structure and microbial processes influencing corrosion. It also...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004130
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... growth. The most important factor controlling the distribution of microorganisms in immersion environments is the availability of nutrients. For example, organic nutrients and bacteria are most abundant in the upper layers of oceans, and both decrease with depth ( Ref 27 ). Microbial biofilms develop...
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 12 Water-treatment system characterized at locations 1 to 5 using molecular microbiological method. Sample descriptions and the principal member of the microbial community in each case are: (1) source water, Acidovorax ; (2) biofilm at well head—microbial community shown in Fig. 13 ; (3 More
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2002
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0003556
EISBN: 978-1-62708-180-1
... Abstract This article focuses on the mechanisms of microbially induced or influenced corrosion (MIC) of metallic materials as an introduction to the recognition, management, and prevention of microbiological corrosion failures in piping, tanks, heat exchangers, and cooling towers. It discusses...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 January 2021
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11.a0006788
EISBN: 978-1-62708-295-2
... was observed under a thicker biofilm (>200 μm versus 120 μm) generated by L. discophora in a mixed-microbial community. This correlated with lower average oxygen concentrations and generally fewer L. discophora cells at the metal surface, but the distribution was uneven. The uneven distribution can...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2006
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13c.a0004105
EISBN: 978-1-62708-184-9
... of the marine environment in which corrosion occurs. The rate of biofilm formation is a function of nutrient concentrations, velocity of water flow, and temperature ( Ref 28 ). Bacterial Films The process of colonization begins immediately upon immersion, with the adsorption of a nonliving organic...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003670
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... are that they are small, ubiquitous, potentially very rapid growing, and subject to certain common restraints, such as temperature, pH, and nutrient availability. A problem exists only when conditions become favorable for a specific microbial population to explode, giving rise to thousands or even millions of cells per...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003656
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... in the system. This method is in its infancy; its acceptance as an on-line sensor in the field remains to be tested in the future. Electrochemical Biofilm Activity Sensor Microbially induced localized penetration of materials can occur due to a combination of microbially mediated electrochemical...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 11B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 May 2022
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v11B.a0006866
EISBN: 978-1-62708-395-9
... Abstract Microbial degradation in the environment is initiated by abiotic (nonliving physical or chemical) processes. Mechanical weathering and other mechanical processes are the main drivers of the initial degradation. This article presents an overview of weathering and biodegradation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0003844
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003606
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... of atmospheric factors, climatic conditions, and air-chemical pollutants that determine the corrosiveness of the atmosphere and contribute to the metal corrosion process are discussed. The article reviews the phenomenon of precipitation runoff on the corroded metal surface and the corrosive microbial effect...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006013
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
.... Eventually, a microbial biofilm is produced, effectively covering the entire underwater portion of the ship hull. This process takes approximately a week, depending on water temperature and location. This biofilm is a relatively rough surface, which makes it ideal, but not essential, for the attachment...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 5B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v05b.a0006059
EISBN: 978-1-62708-172-6
... separation of the suspended solids (already present in the wastewater) and the treated wastewater occurs. The RAS is then recycled to the aeration stage (tank or reactor) to maintain the concentration of microbial activity needed for degradation of the various (mostly organic) constituents found...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003701
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2003
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13a.a0003644
EISBN: 978-1-62708-182-5
... concerning the cause of corrosion. Therefore, statements that certain electrochemical techniques such as the electrochemical noise (ECN) technique “offers unique capabilities that should allow quantification of microbial effects on corrosion,” and “ECN offers promise in identifying microbiologically...