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microalloy

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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 16 Anodic polarization at 0.03 V/min of low-copper amalgam (Microalloy) in artificial saliva and Ringer's solution. Source: Ref 74 More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 26 Anodic polarization at 0.03 V/min of both low (Microalloy) and high (Sybraloy) copper amalgams in artificial saliva. Source: Ref 74 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 3 Thermal cycles for conventional (a) and microalloy (b) steels. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 7 Microstructure of a third-generation microalloy forging steel, which consists of lath martensite and uniformly distributed auto-tempered carbides More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 9 Impact transition temperature profile of a third-generation microalloy steel in Charpy V-notch testing. New alloys maintain adequate toughness to −60 °C (−76 °F) and below. More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 10 Comparison of impact transition properties for third-generation microalloy steel to standard quenched and tempered carbon (1040) and alloy (4140) steel grades. All materials tested at 40 HRC hardness. More
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 9 Influence of vanadium and carbon contents on proof strength of microalloyed DHT steels. Source: Ref 19 More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 6 CCT diagram for a titanium-boron microalloyed steel. T p , peak temperature. Source: Ref 9 More
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Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 26 Effect of microalloying on yield strength of hot- and cold-rolled steel strips More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 4 Microstructure of an as-rolled microalloyed steel plate showing equiaxed ferrite grains with bands. Note the fine ferrite grain size when compared with Fig. 2 . 4% picral + 2% nital etch. Original magnification 200× More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 54 Microstructure of as-rolled microalloyed steel showing ferrite grains and pearlite banding. Note that both the ferrite grains and pearlite bands are revealed. 4% picral + 2% nital. Original magnification 200× More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 6 Effect of microalloying additions on the recrystallization stop temperature of austenite. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 01 January 1989
Fig. 9 Titanium nitrides (E) in UNS G10600 steel microalloyed with titanium and vanadium. Unetched. 270× More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 72 Flow behavior for a niobium-vanadium microalloyed steel deformed in 17 passes in a torsion machine. The specimen temperatures are represented by the upper bold line. Source: Ref 131 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 74 Ferrite structure obtained in a niobium-vanadium microalloyed steel. (a) After 17 passes in the torsion machine. (b) After 17 passes in a production plate mill. Source: Ref 131 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 12 φ 2 =45° sections of a niobium-vanadium microalloyed steel that was quenched after controlled rolling from soaking temperatures of (a) 1250 °C (2280 °F) and (b) 1050 °C (1920 °F) More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 13 Effects of various microalloying additions on the grain-coarsening temperature of austenite. Grain-coarsening temperatures depend on the microalloying level, nitrogen and/or carbon contents, and size of the precipitates. Titanium is the most efficient microalloying element for grain More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 25 Manufacturing sequence for class 8.8 automotive bolts from microalloyed and carbon steels More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 11 Yield strength of a microalloyed steel as a function of finishing temperature. Grain size: 5 μm (200 μin.). Source: Ref 16 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 12 Controlled-rolling process for microalloyed steel bar. Source: Ref 17 More