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melt-zone configuration

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005614
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... metals. This article focuses on essential parameters of EBW, namely, weld and surface geometry, part configuration, melt-zone configuration, weld atmosphere (vacuum and nonvacuum), and joint design. It describes various aspects considered in EBW of thin and thick metal sections and poorly accessible...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001444
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Geometry Part Configuration Configurations for Wide Welds Bridging a Gap Surface Geometry Welds in Butt Joints Joint Design Melt-Zone Configuration Special Joints and Welds Butt Joints Versus Corner and T-Joints Plug and Puddle Welds Multiple-Pass Welds Welds in Corner...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001377
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... at temperatures of less than one-half the melting temperature ( T m ), forge welding is typically conducted at temperatures in the 0.8 to 0.9 T m range. The forge welding temperature is generally selected to be as high as possible with due consideration to avoiding such metallurgical problems as hot shortness...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006133
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Rhenium Diffusion Bonding Friction Welding Explosive Bonding Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding High-Power Beam Welding Solid-state welding is executed under moderate welding conditions, because it does not cause melting of the parent materials during the weld process and it therefore...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006502
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... (approximately 1250 °C, or 2280 °F). This results in melting of a very thin layer of aluminum—on the order of 10 μm—at the interface. As this effect of laser heating is taking place, the heated zone is subjected to roll pressure to improve the contact area. This also helps in increasing the cooling rate...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005567
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... on the order of 0.8 to 0.9 of the melting temperature, which contrasts with hot pressure (thermocompression) welding of ductile face-centered cubic metals, which is normally performed at temperatures of less than one-half the melting temperature. The forge welding temperature is generally selected...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005836
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... Inspection and Servicing A diode is a component with one P and one N conducting semiconductor zone. The P-N junction is responsible for the elementary features of the semiconductor. Figure 6 shows the diode configuration; current will flow only in the direction of the arrow and block any current...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001368
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
..., the joining surfaces are mechanically squeezed together (upset) after they are melted. This procedure helps produce a high-quality weld by squeezing out residual oxides and molten metal, which are detrimental to weld integrity. The removal of molten metal from the weld zone is beneficial because it eliminates...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005633
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... and by the application of pressure. In basic terms, it is a melting and a forging process. The pieces to be joined are suitably heated by many electrical arcs at the joining interface until the pieces are sufficiently hot to perform an upset, thereby forging the pieces together. The process is capable of producing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001376
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... combinations, size limitations, configuration limitations, and bond zone morphology. It provides an overview of the common industrial applications and shop welding applications of EXW products. The article reviews different safety standards and regulations, such as noise and vibration abatement and process...
Book Chapter

By W.R. Kanne, Jr.
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001367
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... is produced by resistance to the flow of electrical current at the interface of the abutting surfaces to be joined. The deformation results from force on the joint in combination with softening from the electrical resistance heat. Upset welding typically results in solid-state welds (no melting at the joint...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005406
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... between a mushy zone and the melt ( Ref 18 ). Before examining the technical details, it is worth noting that all models for microstructure formation on different scales rely on an indicator function that gives the phase state at a specific point in space and time. On the macroscopic scale...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005236
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0