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martensitic transformation

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005435
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
...Abstract Abstract This article assesses the evolution of martensite modeling in the changing materials engineering environment. It describes the physics of displacive transformations using Ginzburg-Landau theory, microstructure representation, dynamics and simulations, density functional theory...
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 1 Flow-block diagram of martensitic transformation as a multilevel dynamic system. See text for explanation of details. More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 2 Austenite-to-martensite transformation. (a) B2 austenite structure. (b) Four austenitic cubes are joined. An alternative tetragonal visualization of the austenite structure is shown by dashed lines. (c) Tetragonal visualization showing distortion from tetragonal to monoclinic (no sides More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 3 The reversible austenite-to-martensite transformation is defined by four characteristic temperatures. Top: volume fraction of martensite (measured by x-ray diffraction or dilatometry, for example). Bottom: heat flow (as measured on a differential scanning calorimeter) More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 4 Martensite transformation temperatures are sharply dependent on nickel contents above 50.5%, making compositional control very important. Adapted from Ref 15 , 16 More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 17 Martensite transformation start temperatures versus carbon content. The range of compositions in which the various types of martensite exist is also shown ( Ref 3 ). Data are from eight different investigators (see Ref 13 ). More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 24 Surface relief observed in martensite transformation in Cu-26.7Zn-4Al (M s approx 20 °C (70 °F), solution heated at 900 °C (1650 °F), quenched in an ice bath, brought to room temperature, then quenched to liquid N 2 temperatures. Courtesy of F. Gift and B. Newbury More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 33 Surface relief due to thermoelastic martensite transformation in a copper-zinc shape memory alloy. Source: Ref 37 . Reprinted with permission More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 34 Temperature hysteresis of thermoelastic martensite transformation in gold-cadmium and nonthermoelastic iron-nickel. Source: Ref 38 . Reprinted with permission More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 37 (a) Scanning electron micrograph of B2-7R(14M) martensite transformation in nickel-aluminum. (b) Twin boundary types. (c) Twin variants. Source: Ref 40 . Reprinted with permission More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 13 Scanning electron micrographs for complete martensite transformation (0.204 J/mm 2 ) during continuous laser scanning More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006286
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
..., section size, and martensitic transformation in quenched titanium alloys. It shows how residual stresses in titanium alloys are evaluated and controlled. Finally, the article describes the stress-relief treatments used to reduce residual stresses. alloying aluminum hardenability heat treatment...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2013
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04a.a0005811
EISBN: 978-1-62708-165-8
...Abstract Abstract Carburization is the process of intentionally increasing the carbon content of a steel surface so that a hardened case can be produced by martensitic transformation during quenching. Like carburizing, carbonitriding involves heating above the upper critical temperature...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003140
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... the secondary phases and martensitic transformations formed in titanium alloy systems. Information on commercial and semicommercial grades and alloys of titanium is tabulated. The article also discusses the different grades of titanium alloys such as alpha, near-alpha alloys, alpha-beta alloys, beta alloys...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003736
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
...Abstract Abstract Martensite is a metastable structure that forms during athermal (nonisothermal) conditions. This article reviews the crystallographic theory, morphologies, orientation relationships, habit plane, and transformation temperature of ferrous martensite microstructures. It examines...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04b.a0005936
EISBN: 978-1-62708-166-5
...” in this volume. The high hardness of tempering and bearing steels can be achieved only by the martensitic transformation that leads to a volume increase and hence size change. Residual stresses are caused—or rather rearranged, because in most cases the component will not enter the final heat treatment free...
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 66 Comparison of cooling curves as a workpiece cools into and through the martensite transformation range for a conventional quenching and tempering process and for interrupted quenching processes. (a) Conventional quenching and tempering. (b) Marquenching. (c) Modified marquenching. Ae 1 More
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Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 11 (a) Experimental data published by Corrigan ( 27 ) for the residual stress in an HY-130/150 weld. (b) Predicted values of residual stress, published by Hibbitt and Marcal ( Ref 28 ), who ignored the austenite-to-martensite transformation in their finite-element method (FEM) analysis More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001100
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
...% Si −200 to 150 −330 to 300 ≈100 ≈180 Source: Ref 5 General Characteristics The martensitic transformation that occurs in the shape memory alloys yields a thermoelastic martensite and develops from a high-temperature austenite phase with long-range order. The martensite typically...
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 30 Scanning electron microscopy image of surface relief created by the martensitic transformation in a single crystal of ZrO 2 . Source: Ref 32 . Reprinted with permission More