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martensitic stainless steels

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005985
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
... Abstract Martensitic stainless steels are the least corrosion-resistant of all stainless alloys. The traditional martensitic stainless steels are iron/chromium/carbon alloys, sometimes with a small amount of nickel and/or molybdenum. This article provides an overview on the influences...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001408
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... Abstract This article describes general welding characteristics such as weld microstructure and weldability. The correlations of preheating and postweld heat treatment practices with carbon contents and welding characteristics of martensitic stainless steels are reviewed. The article contains...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 12
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1987
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v12.a0000611
EISBN: 978-1-62708-181-8
... Abstract This article is an atlas of fractographs that helps in understanding the causes and mechanisms of fracture of martensitic stainless steels and in identifying and interpreting the morphology of fracture surfaces. The fractographs illustrate the fracture surface, high-cycle fatigue...
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Published: 01 October 2014
Fig. 5 Corrosion resistance of martensitic stainless steels with high hardness, Comparison of nitrogen alloyed grade (M340 = ASIS440Mod) with the standard grade AISI 440C. Source: Ref 3 , 7 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 3 Family relationships for standard martensitic stainless steels More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 5 Typical hardnesses of selected martensitic stainless steels More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 1 Range of hardness in various martensitic stainless steels More
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Published: 01 January 1993
Fig. 10 Tempering response of martensitic stainless steels. Source: Ref 15 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 17 Comparison of mechanical properties of martensitic stainless steels. Heat treating schedules were as follows. Type 410: 1 h at 980 °C (1800 °F), oil quench; 2 h at 650 °C (1200 °F), air cool. H-46: 1 h at 1150 °C (2100 °F), air cool; 2 h at 650 °C (1200 °F), air cool. Type 422: 1 h More
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Published: 01 January 2006
Fig. 1 Reduction of fatigue life of a martensitic stainless steel in a saltwater environment. Source: Adapted from Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 January 2005
Fig. 14 Martensitic stainless steel pitchforks were rusting before they left the storeroom; paint was blistering, and the product was unappealing. The cause was due to incorrect surface preparation compounded by poor storage conditions. The forks were hot forged and quenched to obtain More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 7 Typical transition behavior of type 410 martensitic stainless steel. All data from Charpy V-notch tests: A represents material tempered at 790 °C (1450 °F); final hardness, 95 HRB. B represents material tempered at 665 °C (1225 °F); final hardness, 24 HRC. C represents material tempered More
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Published: 01 June 2012
Fig. 7 River patterns evident in a martensitic stainless steel surgical tool brittle fracture (arrow indicates crack growth direction) More
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Published: 31 December 2017
Fig. 6 Character of erosion in type 403 martensitic stainless steel. (a) Macrograph of eroded area. Original magnification: 10×. (b) Unetched section. Original magnification: 10×. (c) Section through several pits. GRARD II etch. Original magnification: 50×. (d) Enlarged portion of (c More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 18 Grain-boundary carbide networks in type 420 martensitic stainless steel (Fe-0.35%C-0.4%Mn-13%Cr) with two different etchants. (a) Vilella's reagent. (b) Beraha's sulfamic acid tint etch. Heat treatment: 1038 °C (1900 °F). Air quench: 177 °C (350 °F) temper. 500× More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 47 Examples of annealed martensitic stainless steel microstructures. (a) 403 etched with 4% picral plus HCl. (b) Bushing-quality 416 etched with Vilella's reagent. (c) 420 etched with Ralph's reagent. (d) Trimrite etched with Vilella's reagent. (e) 440C etched with modified Fry's reagent More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 2 Vibratory cavitation erosion of CA-6NM martensitic stainless steel. (a) Deformation rumpling and pitting at lath boundaries. (b) Early stage of material removal More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 8 Stress range diagrams for AISI 616 (type 422) martensitic stainless steel. (a) Unnotched; (b) notched. A = stress amplitude/mean stress, or R = (1 − A )/(1 + A ). Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 10 Fatigue behavior of Type 410 martensitic stainless steel in air and in a 0.03% NaCl solution. Source: Ref 2 More
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Published: 01 January 2003
Fig. 12 The H 2 S-pH tolerance of low-carbon martensitic stainless steel tested by the slow strain-rate technique. HAC, hydrogen-assisted cracking. Source: Ref 25 More