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martensitic precipitation-hardenable stainless steel

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Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003116
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... steels, whereas the higher-carbon martensitic stainless steels are among the most difficult metals to machine. Austenitic and precipitation-hardening stainless steels vary more widely in machining characteristics within each class than do the ferritic and martensitic grades. Most easily machined...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005961
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
...-7 PH, Alloy PH 15-7 Mo, AM-350, Pyromet 350, AM-355, and Pyromet 355; austenitic PH stainless steel, A-286; cast PH stainless steels; and iron-nickel PH superalloys. annealing austenitic precipitation-hardenable stainless steel heat treatment iron-base superalloys martensitic precipitation...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001412
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
...Abstract Abstract This article commences with a brief description of the solidification characteristics and microstructures of martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless steels. It reviews the welding parameters for types 17-4PH, 15-5PH, PH13-8 Mo, Custom 450, and Custom 455...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005985
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
... this action by its influence on reducing the solubility of carbon in the matrix. Thus, the tempering of the higher-alloy martensitic stainless steels can truly be considered a precipitation-hardening reaction. The higher-carbon, higher-chromium grades are typically stress-relieved only because the removal...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003767
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... microscopic examination microstructures stainless steel metallography stainless steel microstructures STAINLESS STEELS are complex alloys containing a minimum of 11% Cr plus other elements to produce ferritic, martensitic, austenitic, duplex, or precipitation-hardenable grades. Procedures used...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 19
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1996
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v19.a0002403
EISBN: 978-1-62708-193-1
...Abstract Abstract This article summarizes the key mechanical characteristics of various types of stainless steel, including ferritic, austenitic, martensitic, precipitation hardening, and duplex steels. Particular emphasis is on fracture properties and corrosion fatigue. The article tabulates...
Image
Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 1 General comparison of the hot-strength characteristics of austenitic, martensitic, and ferritic stainless steels with those of low-carbon unalloyed steel and semiaustenitic precipitation and transformation-hardening steels. More
Image
Published: 01 January 2000
Fig. 18 General comparison of the hot-strength characteristics of austenitic, martensitic, and ferritic stainless steels with those of low-carbon unalloyed steel and semiaustenitic precipitation and transformation-hardening steels More
Book: Machining
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 16
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1989
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v16.a0002180
EISBN: 978-1-62708-188-7
... in this article. Classification of Stainless Steels Stainless steels can be divided into five families. Four are based on the characteristic microstructure of the alloys in the family: ferritic, martensitic, austenitic, or duplex (austenitic plus ferritic). The fifth family, the precipitation-hardenable...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001048
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
.... It gives some typical compositions of wrought heat-resistant stainless steels, which are grouped into ferritic, martensitic, austenitic, and precipitation-hardening (PH) grades. Quenched and tempered martensitic stainless steels are essentially martensitic and harden when air cooled from the austenitizing...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 23
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2012
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v23.a0005673
EISBN: 978-1-62708-198-6
... steels, martensitic stainless steels, ferritic stainless steels, precipitation-hardening stainless steels, and duplex stainless steels. It contains a table that lists common medical device applications for stainless steels. The article discusses the physical metallurgy and physical and mechanical...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006067
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
...Abstract Abstract Stainless steels are primarily alloys of iron and chromium. They are grouped into five families, primarily based on their microstructure: ferritic, austenitic, martensitic, duplex, and precipitation hardening. Three out of the five families of stainless steels, namely...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003246
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... by light microscopy). The AISI type 304 austenitic weld metal contains delta ferrite, which prevents hot cracking. The 17-4 PH (precipitation-hardening) stainless steel contains delta ferrite stringers in a low-carbon martensitic matrix. The duplex stainless steel (as cast and annealed) contains austenite...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001046
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
...Abstract Abstract This article discusses the composition, characteristics, and properties of the five groups of wrought stainless steels: martensitic stainless steels, ferritic stainless steels, austenitic stainless steels, duplex stainless steels, and precipitation-hardening stainless steels...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001476
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
.... Martensitic Stainless Steels Martensitic stainless steels (types 403, 410, 414, 420, and the 440 series) are weldable with adequate preheat and interpass temperature control ranging from 205 to 315 °C (400 to 600 °F). To restore mechanical properties and reduce the hardened HAZ, a postweld heat treatment...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003203
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... on annealing of different types of stainless steels such as austenitic, ferritic, duplex, martensitic, and precipitation-hardening, and on the heat treatment of superalloys and refractory metals. It discusses the recommended procedures for solution annealing, austenite conditioning, transformation cooling...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 October 2011
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06a.a0005644
EISBN: 978-1-62708-174-0
... to harden when cooled from high temperatures Martensitic stainless 440 … … … … Welding not recommended Ferritic stainless steels 200 (390) … … Anneal after welding 700–850 (1290–1560) Limited transformation to martensite via austenite can occur. Grain growth. Two factors reduce ductility...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003115
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... and mechanical properties of five major stainless steel families, of which four are based on the crystallographic structure of the alloys, including martensitic, ferritic, austenitic, or duplex. The fifth is precipitation-hardenable alloys, based on the type of heat treatment used. The article further discusses...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 6
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1993
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v06.a0001407
EISBN: 978-1-62708-173-3
... temperatures. Few stainless steels contain more than 30 wt% Cr or less than 50 wt% Fe. Historically, stainless steels have been classified by microstructure and are described as ferritic, martensitic, austenitic, or duplex (austenitic and ferritic). In addition, a number of precipitation-hardenable (PH...
Image
Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 16 Room-temperature axial fatigue curves of two maraging (martensitic) grades of precipitation hardening stainless steels with comparable tensile strength. Solid symbols indicate runout for unnotched ( K t = 1) specimens. Best-fit SN curves are shown for notched specimens ( K t = 3 More