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maraging steel

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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 45 Crack growth rates of 18Ni(250) maraging steel (1648 MPa, or 239 ksi, yield strength) in hydrogen at 133 kPa (1000 torr) as a function of test temperature and stress intensity range. Source: Ref 274 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 2 Hardness of 18Ni(250) maraging steel versus aging time for various aging temperatures. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 3 Microhardness of a weld heat-affected zone in 18Ni(250) maraging steel. Source: Ref 4 More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 13 Strain-life behavior of 18% Ni maraging steel More
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Published: 01 January 1996
Fig. 16 Fatigue crack development in alloy-depleted zones in 18% Ni maraging steel More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 30 Tensile fracture of maraging steel showing transition from cup feature from one half of the fracture to the other half, that is, not a complete cup-and-cone More
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Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 15 Fatigue fracture in 18% Ni, grade 250, maraging steel tested at room temperature. (a) Extensive secondary cracking can be seen in a lower-magnification fractograph. 126×. (b) The cracking is clearly evident in a higher 1440× magnification fractograph. Secondary cracks formed More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 100 Fracture in a thermally embrittled cobalt-free high-titanium maraging steel. (a) Secondary electron image of fracture surface. 1300 ×. (b) TEM extraction fractograph. 2150 ×. (c) Light micrograph of fracture edge, 260 ×. (d) Light micrograph of internal cracks, 260 ×. Light micrograph More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 808 Same fracture surface in 18% Ni, grade 300, maraging steel as in Fig. 806 and 807 , shown here at still higher magnification. At bottom, fatigue has produced numerous secondary cracks. Note the stretched zone at center, at the transition from fatigue to final fast fracture. SEM More
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Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 816 Low-cycle fatigue fracture of 18% Ni, grade 300, maraging steel (heat treatment not reported). This has relatively uniformly spaced fatigue striations with fewer secondary cracks than are seen in Fig. 812 , 813 , 814 , and 815 . The pattern of striations is similar More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 69 Martensitic microstructure of 18Ni(250) maraging steel in the (a) solution-annealed condition (305 HV) and the (b) solution-annealed and aged condition (523 HV). Revealed using modified Fry's reagent More
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Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 70 Martensitic microstructure of low-residual 18Ni(250) maraging steel in the (a) solution-annealed condition (319 HV) and the (b) solution-annealed and aged condition (565 HV). Revealed using modified Fry's reagent More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 14 Age-hardening kinetics curves of 1RK91 maraging steel simulated from a model calculation in comparison with experimental hardness measurement data. HV, Vickers hardness More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 15 Fatigue fracture in 18% Ni, grade 250 maraging steel tested at room temperature. (a) Extensive secondary cracking can be seen in a lower-magnification fractograph. Original magnification: 126×. (b) The cracking is clearly evident in a higher-magnification fractograph. Original More
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Published: 15 January 2021
Fig. 30 Tensile fracture of maraging steel shows transition from cup feature from one half of the fracture to the other half, that is, not a complete cup-and-cone More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01.a0001043
EISBN: 978-1-62708-161-0
... Abstract Maraging steels comprise a special class of high-strength steels that differ from conventional steels in that they are hardened by a metallurgical reaction that does not involve carbon. Instead, these steels are strengthened by the precipitation of intermetallic compounds...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 12
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1987
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v12.a0000614
EISBN: 978-1-62708-181-8
... Abstract This article is an atlas of fractographs that helps in understanding the causes and mechanisms of fracture of maraging steels and in identifying and interpreting the morphology of fracture surfaces. The fractographs illustrate the tensile-test fracture, low-cycle fatigue fracture...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4D
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 October 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04d.a0005948
EISBN: 978-1-62708-168-9
... Abstract Maraging steels are highly alloyed low-carbon iron-nickel martensite steels that possess an excellent combination of strength and toughness superior to that of most carbon-hardened steels. This article provides a detailed account of the formation of martensite in maraging steels...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003767
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... Abstract This article describes metallographic preparation and examination techniques for stainless steels and maraging steels. It presents a series of micrographs demonstrating microstructural features of these alloys. Procedures used to prepare stainless steels for macroscopic and microscopic...
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 4 Plane-strain fracture toughness of maraging steels compared with fracture toughness of several ultrahigh strength steels as a function of tensile strength. Source: Ref 2 More