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magnetic permeability

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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 5 Magnetic permeability of some Fluxtrol soft-magnetic composite materials as a function of magnetic field strength. More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 9 Relative magnetic permeability as a function of magnetic field intensity (range 100 to 1500 A/in., or 39 to 590 A/cm) and temperature (range 10 to 750 °C, or 50 to 1382 °F). Source: Ref 55 More
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Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 7 Magnetic permeability as a function of temperature and magnetic field intensity. Source: Ref 6 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 8 Induction and relative magnetic permeability of some ferromagnetic steels as a function of magnetic field strength. 1, (0.23% C); 2, (1.78% C). Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 12 Distribution of relative magnetic permeability within a ferromagnetic body. H 0 , surface magnetic field intensity (A/cm); x , distance from the surface; δ 0 , penetration depth calculated with surface permeability. Source: Ref 12 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 6 Typical variation in relative magnetic permeability (µ r ) during induction hardening and induction tempering More
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 13 Influence of cold work on the magnetic permeability of C17200 and selected other materials More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 2 Effect of magnetic permeability on coil current (a) and efficiency (b); curves generated from computer simulation of heating a flat plate using a single leg of an inductor; 50 kW in the part under the coil face. Source: Ref 3 . More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 2 Hysteresis loops and differential magnetic permeabilities as a function of magnetic field for (1) the core (non-heat-treated steels with 0.4% C material), (2) the case (same steel after induction heat treatment), and (3) a double-layer specimen consisting of both materials More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006324
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
... properties of cast iron in terms of magnetic intensity, magnetic induction, magnetic permeability, remanent magnetism, coercive force, and hysteresis loss. It concludes with a discussion on the acoustic properties of cast iron. acoustic properties cast iron chemical composition coercive force...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005896
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
..., and specific heat. It describes the two important electromagnetic properties, electrical resistivity (electrical conductivity) and magnetic permeability, which posses the most pronounced effect on the performance of the induction heating system, its efficiency, and selection of main design parameters...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 17
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v17.a0006467
EISBN: 978-1-62708-190-0
... provides a discussion on electromagnetic systems, eddy-current systems, and magnetic permeability systems for detection of flaws on steel bars. It concludes with a description of nondestructive inspection of steel billets. cracks eddy-current system electromagnetic inspection inclusions liquid...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 7
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 September 2015
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v07.a0006057
EISBN: 978-1-62708-175-7
... Abstract Powder metallurgy (PM) techniques are effective in making magnetically soft components for use in magnetic part applications. This article provides an account of the factors affecting magnetism, permeability, and hysteresis losses. It includes information on the magnetic properties...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003234
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... and nonferromagnetic metals and metal parts. Giving a brief introduction on the uses of eddy-current inspection, this article discusses the operating principles and the principal operating variables encountered in eddy-current inspection, including coil impedance, electrical conductivity, magnetic permeability, lift...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 17
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 August 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v17.a0006450
EISBN: 978-1-62708-190-0
.... This article discusses the advantages and limitations of eddy-current inspection, as well as the development of the eddy-current inspection process. It reviews the principal operating variables encountered in eddy-current inspection: coil impedance, electrical conductivity, magnetic permeability, lift-off...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005879
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... field (EMF) calculations are the electrical conductivity (γ), which depends on the temperature of the heated body; the magnetic permeability (μ), which depends not only on the temperature but also on the magnetic field density ( B ); and the frequency of field current ( f ). The material properties...
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Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 6 Variations in the permeability index of P/M iron as a function of (a) sintering temperature, (b) duration of sintering, and (c) forming pressure. The magnetic permeability (for a constant magnetizing force) is shown as a percentage of the permeability of annealed, hot-rolled, low-carbon More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 10 Effect of temperature and magnetic field intensity on relative magnetic permeability of low-carbon steel. Source: Ref 10 More
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Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 14 Magnetic properties of steel. (a) Effect of temperature and magnetic field intensity on relative magnetic permeability of medium-carbon steel. (b) Effect of carbon content on Curie temperature of plain carbon steel at a sufficiently slow heating rate. Source: Ref 1 More
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Published: 01 November 2010
Fig. 8 Magnetic properties of steel. (a) Effect of temperature field intensity on relative magnetic permeability of medium-carbon steel. (b) Effect of carbon content on Curie temperature of plain carbon steel at a heating rate less than 70 °C/s. Source: Ref 1 More