1-20 of 642 Search Results for

magnetic field strength

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Image
Published: 01 December 1998
Fig. 3 Schematic of the flux density, B , versus magnetic field strength, H , for diamagnetic, paramagnetic, and ferromagnetic materials More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005913
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
..., nanoparticles, induction heating setup, and magnetic field strength. hyperthermia induction heating coils magnetic field nanoparticles solenoid coils thermal gradient Induction heating is a convenient and flexible method to deliver high-strength magnetic fields to nanoparticles, resulting...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4C
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 09 June 2014
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04c.a0005877
EISBN: 978-1-62708-167-2
... density, current density, magnetic field strength, and magnetic flux density. This article describes the behavior of the EMF by Maxwell's equations in integral or differential forms. It discusses the definition of potentials; methods of mathematical modeling; boundary conditions; and energy, power density...
Image
Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 5 Magnetic permeability of some Fluxtrol soft-magnetic composite materials as a function of magnetic field strength. More
Image
Published: 15 December 2019
, increases with magnetic field strength. More
Image
Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 8 Induction and relative magnetic permeability of some ferromagnetic steels as a function of magnetic field strength. 1, (0.23% C); 2, (1.78% C). Source: Ref 10 More
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 38 Magnetoresistance of iron at −269 °C (4.2 K). Curves represent data for the application of the magnetic field strength ( H ) parallel and perpendicular to the electrical current ( i ). R H resistance in field H ; R 0 , resistance in no field. R 0 at 293 K is 258 times greater than R More
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003233
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
..., however, residual magnetization is rarely used because use of an applied magnetizing field ensures that the material is in the required magnetic state and because applied fields provide more flexibility. (It is possible to produce high or low flux density.) Control of the strength and direction...
Image
Published: 01 January 1990
Fig. 11 Magnetic saturation of binary nickel-iron alloys at various field strengths. All samples were annealed at 1000 °C (1830 °F) and cooled in the furnace. More
Image