1-20 of 161 Search Results for

macroetching

Follow your search
Access your saved searches in your account

Would you like to receive an alert when new items match your search?
Close Modal
Sort by
Book Chapter

By Samuel M. Purdy
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 9
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2004
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v09.a0003750
EISBN: 978-1-62708-177-1
... Abstract Macroetching is a procedure for revealing the large-scale structure of a metallic specimen, that is, the structure visible with the unaided eye, by etching an appropriately prepared surface. This article provides information on the basic procedures for macroetching as well...
Image
Published: 01 January 1987
Fig. 66 The roll surface of the spall shown in Fig. 65 after macroetching with 10% aqueous HNO 3 . Etching revealed a craze crack pattern similar to heat checks, caused by abusive service conditions. About 0.5× More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 3 Conditions revealed by macroetching with 50% HCl solution. (a) Carbon spot segregation in top billet of medium-carbon alloy steel. This degree of separation is acceptable ( Ref 4 ). 0.33×. (b) Splash in bottom billet of an alloy steel ingot. Unacceptable in any degree ( Ref 4 ). 0.33 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2004
Fig. 4 Conditions revealed by macroetching with 50% HCl solution. (a) Bleeding (gassy) in top billet of alloy steel. Unacceptable in any degree ( Ref 4 ). 0.33×. (b) Butt tears in bottom billet of alloy steel. Unacceptable in any degree ( Ref 4 ). 0.33×. (c) Flute marks in bottom billet More
Image
Published: 09 June 2014
Fig. 17 Induction-hardened steel bar macroetched to show spiral band of prequenched material More
Image
Published: 30 September 2014
Fig. 52 Macroetched cross section of quenched and tempered AISI 4340 alloy steel showing pure quench crack. Source: Ref 42 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 13(b) Macroetched disk cut from the head of the sledge hammer shown in Fig. 13(a) . The heavily decarburized surface is revealed by macroetching. Actual size More
Image
Published: 31 October 2011
Fig. 2 Schematic macroetched section of a general friction stir welded microstructure with its different zones. TMAZ, thermomechanically affected zone; HAZ, heat-affected zone More
Image
Published: 01 December 2008
Fig. 13 Macroetched cross section of a 22.2 by 25 cm (8.75 by 10 in.) continuously cast bloom in the as-cast condition. Source: Ref 6 More
Image
Published: 01 January 2002
Fig. 46 Macroetched (10% aqueous nitric acid) face of a cutter blade made from AISI S7 steel. Macroetching reveals the influence of frictional heat from service (dark-etching areas) that produce localized back-tempering (softening). More
Image
Published: 31 August 2017
Fig. 17 Macroetched section of a 20 cm (8 in.) diameter cylinder showing chunk graphite in the center. Source: Ref 48 More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 46 Macroetched (10% aqueous nitric acid) face of a cutter blade made from AISI S7 steel. Macroetching reveals the influence of frictional heat from service (dark-etching areas) that produces localized back tempering (softening). More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 74 Analyzed rim section showing fracture locations and macroetch performed on a section More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 75 Macroetch results of section taken 9.5 mm (⅜ in.) from the rim face More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 76 Closeup of branched cracking present in the macroetch sample More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 101 Macroetch results of failed weld More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 51 Macroetched view of a tube cross section showing stress-assisted cracks at the weld attachment More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 80 Macroetched view showing transverse cross section of the failed tube More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 31 Macroetched cross section through a portion of the cracked connection. A gap in the weld root can be seen. All of the cracking is contained within the disc (weld plate). The cracking initiated at both fillet weld toes and eventually grew together. More
Image
Published: 30 August 2021
Fig. 32 Macroetched cross section of a portion of the assembly that was not cracked. Notice the lack of a root gap (i.e., tight fit-up). More