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lost-wax investment molding

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Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02.a0001082
EISBN: 978-1-62708-162-7
.... It discusses the various types of molding methods, namely, rammed graphite molding, and lost-wax investment molding. The article provides information on the casting design, melting, and pouring practices, and describes the microstructure, hot isostatic pressing, heat treatment, and mechanical properties of Ti...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005337
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
.... It discusses the types of molding methods, such as rammed graphite molding and lost-wax investment molding. The article provides information on the casting design, melting, postcasting, and pouring practices. It describes the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-6AI-4V alloy. The article examines...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005253
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... to the lost foam casting method, where the foam pattern is not melted out before the molten metal is introduced but during the introduction of the molten metal, thus the term lost foam . Fig. 3 Wax molding machine for investment casting Fig. 4 Wax cluster Fig. 5 Ceramic-coated wax...
Book Chapter

Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005256
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... of the investment casting process in terms of molding but with an expendable pattern made from high-quality expanded polystyrene (EPS) as in lost foam (instead of the lost wax pattern of investment casting). The EPS pattern is coated in ceramic slurry and then fired to produce the ceramic mold. The firing process...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006519
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
... before the molten metal is introduced but during the introduction of the molten metal, thus the term lost foam . The basic steps of the shell process are illustrated in Fig. 4 . Fig. 1 Wax molding machine for investment casting. Source: Ref 4 Fig. 2 Wax cluster. Source: Ref 4...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005255
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... Abstract This article reviews the pattern materials used in investment casting, which can be loosely grouped into waxes and plastics. The patternmaking process, pattern tooling, and pattern and cluster assembly are described. The article also describes the manufacture of ceramic shell molds...
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003172
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... listed in Table 1 , green sand molding is the most prevalent. Expendable mold/expendable pattern processes use wax patterns (investment casting) or foamed plastic patterns (lost foam casting). The investment casting process is one of the oldest casting processes known (it has been used for more than...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005306
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
.... Of necessity, the casting mold systems must be relatively inert to molten titanium. Proprietary lost wax ceramic shell systems were developed by the various foundries engaged in titanium casting. Usually, the face coats of the ceramic shells are made with the proprietary coatings, and conventional refractory...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0009025
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... solidification of the enclosed web section until after the adjacent heavier sections had begun to contract. Fig. 6 In this investment cast gimbal ring, of 4130 steel, a finger of mold material surrounded by molten metal became excessively hot and retarded the freezing of the web section where shown...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.9781627082075
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 2A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 30 November 2018
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v02a.a0006508
EISBN: 978-1-62708-207-5
..., vaporizing the foam pattern and replacing the foam patterns with an aluminum part. This expendable pattern casting process is somewhat similar to investment casting that uses a wax pattern to create a ceramic mold cavity. Unlike investment casting, where the wax pattern is melted away from the ceramic mold...
Book Chapter

Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005251
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... halves are opened and the pattern removed. Metal is poured into the cavity. The mold is broken and the casting removed. Tons 1–5° 635 25 All $800–4000 Samples: 2–6 weeks Production: 2–6 weeks after approval Investment (lost wax) A metal mold makes wax replicas surrounded by an investment...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0009019
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... the necessary impression in the molding material. Although the pattern may be re-used, the mold is expendable. In investment casting, a metal die is used to produce wax or plastic patterns. These patterns, in turn, are used to produce ceramic molds, either solid or shell. Both the patterns and the ceramic molds...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 1A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 31 August 2017
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v01a.a0006297
EISBN: 978-1-62708-179-5
... applications. It retains water to a higher temperature (1000 °C, or 1832 °F) compared to Southern bentonite (700 °C, or 1292 °F). When the sections of the mold reach these temperatures, the bonding power of the bentonite is lost, and it is called “dead” clay. Western bentonite with its sodium base develops...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 24
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 June 2020
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v24.a0006556
EISBN: 978-1-62708-290-7
... ). Concurrent to its use to make consumable investment casting patterns, these early AM technologies were also used to make the pattern masters, the nonconsumable (permanent or semipermanent) component that is used to form a rubber mold for making wax patterns via wax injection. Rubber (latex or silicone...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0009015
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... strippable after the metal solidifies The first requirement is that the mold material must flow or be pliable enough to encapsulate the surface around the shape of the pattern. Patterns can be either expendable; as in lost-foam casting and investment or lost-wax casting; or permanent. Permanent...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005308
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... mold (see the articles “Investment Casting” and "Replicast Molding" and the discussion of the lost foam process in the article “Lost Foam Casting” in this Volume). The pattern equipment (tooling) needed to make a casting includes the pattern and may also include one or more core boxes. Core boxes...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005338
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... and investment (i.e., lost-wax) molding. The rammed graphite process is by far the most common method used for zirconium castings. The rammed graphite process can be used for all sizes of castings up to 1040 kg (2300 lb). (See Fig. 2 for a process flow outline of the rammed graphite process.) The investment...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005186
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... in existence, a copper frog, is cast in Mesopotamia. 3000 B.C.—Early metalcasters cast bronze tools and weapons in permanent stone molds. 3000–2500 B.C.—Small objects are cast via lost-wax (investment casting) process in the Near East. 1500 B.C.—Wrought iron is discovered in the Near East. 600 B.C...
Book: Casting
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 15
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2008
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v15.a0005249
EISBN: 978-1-62708-187-0
... Most of the advantages to be gained from the use of plaster molds have to do with casting quality: As-cast surface finishes of 50 to 125 root mean square (approximately ISO N7 or N8) are readily obtained. By using flexible rubber patterns and incorporating the advantages of lost-wax techniques...