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lattice correspondence

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Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 6 Schematic lattice correspondence between the body-centered cubic (bcc) β phase and the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) α phase during β → α transformation maintaining Burgers orientation relationship in both (a) to (c) three dimension and (e) to (f) two dimension. Source: Ref 15 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 7 Schematic lattice correspondences between β (body-centered cubic, or bcc) and α″ (orthorhombic) phases during β → α″ martensitic transformation. Source: Ref 5 More
Image
Published: 01 June 2016
Fig. 11 Schematic lattice correspondences between the body-centered cubic (bcc) β phase and the hexagonal close-packed α phase during β → α transformation when maintaining (a) Pitsch-Schrader and (b) Burgers orientation relationships More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 4E
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 June 2016
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v04e.a0006277
EISBN: 978-1-62708-169-6
..., and transformation texture development during heat treatment of multicomponent alpha/beta and beta titanium alloys. It includes quantitative description of Burgers orientation relationship and path, discussion of lattice correspondence between the alpha and beta phases, and determination of the total number...
Image
Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 6 Reciprocal lattice and Ewald construction corresponding to LEED and comparison to real-space picture. (a) Real-space schematic diagram of diffraction from a surface. The electron beam is incident on the sample along the direction given by e − . The five diffracted beams represent More
Image
Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 6 Reciprocal lattice and Ewald construction corresponding to low-energy electron diffraction and comparison to real-space picture. (a) Real-space schematic diagram of diffraction from a surface. The electron beam is incident on the sample along the direction given by e − . The five More
Image
Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 3 Plot of grain boundary planes in the fcc lattice that correspond to low energy orientation relationships (LEORs). It is assumed that the LEORS are symmetric tilt grain boundaries with the tilt axis [−101]. When the angle of misorientation increases from 0° to 180°, some grain boundaries More
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Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 13 (a) Simulated γ/γ′ microstructures with ±0.3% lattice misfit and no external load, aged at 1300 K for 4.7 h. After an additional 5.6 h aging under 152 MPa tensile stress along [001], rafted microstructures developed from (a) by assuming lattice misfit of (b) −0.3% and (c) +0.3%. Source More
Image
Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 7 Diffraction pattern from a superlattice. (a) Rectangular substrate lattice and corresponding diffraction pattern showing fundamental reflections. (b) Substrate plus p (2 × 1) overlayer and corresponding diffraction pattern showing fundamental and superlattice reflections. The overlayer More
Image
Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 7 Diffraction pattern from a superlattice. (a) Rectangular substrate lattice and corresponding diffraction pattern showing fundamental reflections. (b) Substrate plus p (2 × 1) overlayer and corresponding diffraction pattern showing fundamental and superlattice reflections. The overlayer More
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Published: 01 January 1986
Fig. 11 Impurity atom taking tetrahedral and octahedral interstitial sites for fcc crystals. The schematic of the lattice planes and strings and their corresponding form of the angular yield profiles. Source: Ref 21 More
Image
Published: 15 December 2019
Fig. 13 Impurity atom taking tetrahedral and octahedral interstitial sites for face-centered cubic crystals. The schematics show the lattice planes and strings and their corresponding form of the angular yield profiles. Source: Ref 34 More
Image
Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 8 Transition of the critical nucleus from a single-variant to a two-variant configuration with increasing lattice misfit. (a) ξ = 0.5. (b) ξ = 0.8. (c) ξ = 1.0. The corresponding nucleation barriers are shown in (d). (Model output images are in color.) More
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 22A
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 2009
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v22a.a0005424
EISBN: 978-1-62708-196-2
... of the elastic stretch tensor was taken as the identity (corresponding to zero initial lattice strain). With this level of resolution, the simulations capture stress variations between crystals. However, because the order of the elemental interpolation is low (trilinear velocity field within crystals), stress...
Image
Published: 01 August 2013
Fig. 15 Electron backscatter diffraction maps of quenching and partitioning steel tension tested at 0 °C (32 °F). White corresponds to face-centered cubic lattice (retained austenite). Gray scale indicates the image quality, where darker-gray scale indicates lower image quality (higher More
Image
Published: 01 December 2009
Fig. 5 Monte Carlo model simulation of texture-controlled grain growth for a material with two texture components. (a) Comparison of predicted grain-growth kinetics (solid line) and normal grain-growth kinetics (broken line). MU, model lattice units; MCS, Monte Carlo steps. (b) Simulated (100 More
Series: ASM Desk Editions
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 December 1998
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.mhde2.a0003251
EISBN: 978-1-62708-199-3
... the Debye-Scherrer camera and the X-ray diffractometer. The article also describes the uses of XRD analyses, such as the identification of phases or compounds in metals and ceramics; detection of order and disorder transformation; determination of lattice parameters and changes in lattice parameters due...
Series: ASM Handbook Archive
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 1986
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0001769
EISBN: 978-1-62708-178-8
..., the radius of the Ewald sphere or its orientation relative to the rods changes, consequently also changing the points of intersection with the rods. The directions of the outgoing vectors define the directions of the diffracted beams. Fig. 6 Reciprocal lattice and Ewald construction corresponding...
Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 10
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 15 December 2019
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v10.a0006655
EISBN: 978-1-62708-213-6
... orientation relative to the rods changes, consequently also changing the points of intersection with the rods. The directions of the outgoing vectors define the directions of the diffracted beams. Fig. 6 Reciprocal lattice and Ewald construction corresponding to low-energy electron diffraction...
Book Chapter

Series: ASM Handbook
Volume: 13B
Publisher: ASM International
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.31399/asm.hb.v13b.a0006544
EISBN: 978-1-62708-183-2
... Abstract The crystal structure of a material is an important aspect of corrosion and oxidation processes. This article provides a general introduction to the crystal structure of materials, providing information on the crystal systems, lattice dimensions, nomenclature, and solid-solution...